314 reputation
29
bio website
location Melbourne, Australia
age
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen 43 mins ago

1d
comment Are fundamental forces always attractive/repulsive, i.e. parallel to the separation?
@CuriousOne, I'm not asking whether such a thing has been observed (although I'd be interested if it had!), I'm asking whether there are theoretical reasons to believe that such a thing is not possible.
1d
awarded  Editor
1d
revised Are fundamental forces always attractive/repulsive, i.e. parallel to the separation?
added 273 characters in body
1d
comment Are fundamental forces always attractive/repulsive, i.e. parallel to the separation?
@CuriousOne yes that is an interesting article, +1. My question is about whether such things can't exist in the real world.
1d
comment Are fundamental forces always attractive/repulsive, i.e. parallel to the separation?
@jabirali yes, assume the particles are travelling slowly relative to the speed of light and don't take into account the small difference between where they "currently" are (if that means anything) and where they've been.
1d
comment Are fundamental forces always attractive/repulsive, i.e. parallel to the separation?
@jabirali not at all. Do you imagine it doesn't apply to the hypothetical monopole case?
1d
comment Are fundamental forces always attractive/repulsive, i.e. parallel to the separation?
@CuriousOne, you can always obtain classical behaviour in the limit. Consider the question to be about "an electrically charged large object" passing by "a magnetically charged large object".
1d
asked Are fundamental forces always attractive/repulsive, i.e. parallel to the separation?
Sep
23
awarded  Commentator
Sep
23
comment Is it possible to create artificial gravity by magnetizing iron in the blood stream?
"For a human ... you will need a field 5 times as intense" That is incorrect. Perhaps you are thinking of the case where you have two objects of different mass but the same charge. But in this case the "charge" is proportional to the mass (assuming frog and human have very similar magnetic properties). Another way of looking at it is that a human is composed of many frog-sized pieces which should all accelerate as a frog would. It's slightly complicated by the fact that the field necessarily varies along the vertical axis, but assuming the same gradient, the average field will be the same.
Aug
23
comment Is it possible to avoid the radiation that caused the American flag turned into white on the Moon?
With no wind to speak of on the moon, a normal flag would just hang limply. The aluminium was probably to give them some stiffness.
Aug
13
comment What is the next step beyond quantum computation?
Your oracle machine with finite memory, and therefore a finite number of states, will not work. After a finite number of computational steps (less than or equal to its number of states) it will enter a state it has previously been in, and from then on repeat the cycle that led to that state.
Apr
13
awarded  Nice Question
Apr
2
comment Why Do Sausages Always Split Lengthwise?
The cylinder is not assumed infinite. Fluid pressure always acts orthogonally to a surface. A cylinder's side is parallel to its axis so doesn't contribute to axial stress. Only the ends can do that, and an infinite cylinder doesn't have ends.
Mar
1
awarded  Notable Question
Sep
19
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
16
awarded  Nice Question
Feb
28
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
20
answered How much better is salt water at letting through microwaves than pure water?
Feb
8
awarded  Yearling