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visits member for 4 years, 3 months
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Apr
23
comment True randomness via Radioactive decay
OK, your edit makes a difference. A truly random sequence will be incompressible on average due to the pigeon-hole principle. But if you want to know if a particular finite sequence was taken from a "truly random" source, statistics can give you a hint but never prove anything. It just seems like a bad way to define randomness. If I told you I had generated a random bit and it was a 1, would you be able to tell if it was "truly random"? The only definition that makes a bit of sense is for nobody to have been able to predict that it would be a 1.
Apr
23
comment True randomness via Radioactive decay
It goes the other way too - you can have high Kolmogorov Complexity with low or no randomness, for example if you are reading from a table of "random" numbers, I can perfectly predict what you will say if I have a copy of the table or can see over your shoulder. There is no fundamentally unpredictable quantum process going on.
Apr
23
comment True randomness via Radioactive decay
Kolmogorov Complexity is irrelevant. Assuming your measurements have finite precision there is a certain probability of obtaining [1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1] for the first ten intervals, which obviously has low Kolmogorov Complexity, but was still perfectly unpredictable.
Apr
11
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
11
awarded  Yearling
Apr
10
answered Are there any scales other than temperature that have different zero points?
Apr
10
answered Are there any scales other than temperature that have different zero points?
Apr
10
answered Are there any scales other than temperature that have different zero points?
Apr
5
comment How can anti-matter annihilate matter?
@RBarryYoung antiparticles have opposite charges of all types (except mass/energy) so forces carried by spin-1 bosons will be attractive.
Mar
29
awarded  Yearling
Mar
29
comment Why is the prospective new kilogram standard a sphere?
@Floris: thanks, didn't see that. Edited answer.
Mar
29
revised Why is the prospective new kilogram standard a sphere?
acknowledge priority of David Richerby's comment
Mar
28
asked spooky nonlocal communication, or bad abstract?
Mar
25
answered Why is the prospective new kilogram standard a sphere?
Feb
26
comment Intuition as to why the orientation (of a 3D object) is not a conserved quantity?
@A.Donda there would still be a large class of objects whose "centre of angle" vector was the (directionless) zero vector despite having a recognizable orientation (ie. no circular symmetry).
Jan
19
comment Relationship Between Acoustics and Gravity?
@soultrane, you mean earthquakes? It's still much easier to detect the vibrations themselves than any gravitational waves given off, and in fact earth tremors are considered unwanted "noise" to the people trying to detect astronomical gravitational waves (LIGO and others), because they vibrate the detector directly with no need for gravitational transmission.
Jan
19
answered Relationship Between Acoustics and Gravity?
Jan
15
awarded  Curious
Jan
14
asked fate of a hadron in a big rip
Jan
4
comment If gravitation is due to space-time curvature, how can a body free-fall in a straight line?
So has anyone managed to measure the purely spatial component of curvature due to gravity? (eg. angles of a triangle not summing to 180°) I suppose you'd want as large a triangle as possible, and you'd use laser beams as your "straight ruler", but they get deflected by gravity too, which you would have to take into account. And on Earth, refracted by variations in air density. Maybe it would be easier in space, even if the curvature is less.