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seen Nov 24 at 15:33

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Jan
27
accepted Kinetic energy of a cylinder
Jan
27
comment Kinetic energy of a cylinder
Thank you very much for your very detailed answer, that more general formula at the end is what I was looking for.
Jan
27
awarded  Student
Jan
26
comment Kinetic energy of a cylinder
You've done what I've done. I get the same results, the only problem is that the energy from the moving end is not the same as for the other two points
Jan
26
comment Kinetic energy of a cylinder
@MichaelBrown But in the moving end, wouldn't I have to add the kinetic energy corresponding to the moving ref. frame? That is: $1/2mv^2$, being $v$ the speed of that point, the same way that I have to add that term when the ref. frame is in the center of mass?
Jan
26
asked Kinetic energy of a cylinder
Jan
24
answered Does light accelerate or slow down during reflection?
Jan
22
comment Hamilton's equations for a simple pendulum
Thanks for the info, so I will get to the same second order differential equation? And about the phase space?
Jan
22
asked Hamilton's equations for a simple pendulum
Jan
22
comment Current without Voltage and Voltage without Current?
@JerrySchirmer Really, isn't it that they just have super low resistence? I mean, I know that a very very very low voltage could produce a huge current, but would a superconductor in total absence of voltage difference produce a current?
Jan
22
answered Current without Voltage and Voltage without Current?
Jan
21
answered What exactly are we doing when we set $c=1$?
Jan
20
answered Is enthalpy defined under non-isobaric conditions?
Jan
20
comment Magnetic force on capacitor
Thanks for the help, I had actually solved it with wolfram, the problem is that the exam has problems similar to this one and I won't be able to use any tools like that... I guess if thre's no other way of solving it I won't see a problem like that in the exam. I have actually seen how to do that integral by hand and it's long as hell.
Jan
20
comment Magnetic force on capacitor
@EmilioPisanty But the derivative is not wrt, as I will need to calculate the gradient (it only depends on z coordinate, so I will have to calculate $\partial_zU_{magnetic}$. ¿Could you explain yourself a little more, please?
Jan
20
asked Magnetic force on capacitor
Jan
19
revised How does this chair move?
edited body
Jan
16
answered What kills you: Voltage or Electric current?
Jan
15
comment Hamiltonian and non conservative force
¿Doesn't the book give any info about the direction of the speed? If the result is $H=\frac{1}{2}m(\dot x^2+ \dot y^2)$, that means that v is perpendicular to A, so the particle is moving up or down along the z axis (that's the direction of B)
Jan
15
awarded  Supporter