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bio website lightnesspyramid.com
location Nottingham, United Kingdom
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♪ The autumn leaves keep turning to the colour of your hair. ♫

#MySenseOverIntelliSense

I think that Clueless was very deep. I think it was deep in the way that it was very light. I think lightness has to come from a very deep place if it's true lightness. — Alicia Silverstone

I frequent Stack Overflow and Science Fiction & Fantasy, the latter of which is all fun and games until you get a random week-long suspension for politely and briefly expressing surprise that people still care whether Han or Greedo "officially" shot first (get over it!), then the officiating moderator entirely ignores all your requests for a dialogue…

Upvotes are not for "correcting" downvotes. It is not your job to take away somebody else's right to vote. Only upvote if you thought that it was a great question/answer, not because you disagreed with somebody else's downvote.


        


1d
comment Why can't we see light travelling from point A to B?
I'm not sure whether this is a question about light echoes, or a fundamental misunderstanding of what it means to see something.
Jul
24
awarded  Excavator
Jul
24
revised Will heating up an object increase its mass?
Grammar fixes
Jul
24
suggested approved edit on Will heating up an object increase its mass?
Jul
19
comment Definition of event horizon - Gravity around blackholes
What's your question?
Jul
1
comment How to emulate 40ft (12 m) of water?
@JohnRennie: Alright, gotcha :)
Jul
1
comment How to emulate 40ft (12 m) of water?
@steveverrill: Hmm yeah okay :)
Jul
1
comment How to emulate 40ft (12 m) of water?
@DavidRicherby: I suppose the force is still there even though (or even "more so since") the water itself doesn't absorb it by compressing? [I'm not a physicist :P]
Jul
1
comment How to emulate 40ft (12 m) of water?
Hang on... if water doesn't compress, then what is "pressurized water"? o.O
Jun
7
comment What is the essential difference between a resonance and a particle?
You could always read the cited papers. Wikipedia should not be treated as a primary source anyway...
May
26
comment How does a spacecraft enter Earth's atmosphere?
@Steve: You shouldn't throw things out of car windows.
May
2
comment What is the uncertainty principle?
I'm not sure.​​
Apr
17
comment Why does moving through time not require energy?
Not really, no.
Mar
29
comment In an electron-positron annihilation, in what direction are the photons released?
Capital letters and full stops, please!!
Mar
28
comment Why do we use microwaves in microwave oven?
@JohnRennie: I never said it was obvious. I said the OP is failing to perform any research, or to read the material presented to him.
Mar
28
comment Why do we use microwaves in microwave oven?
@JohnRennie: Do you disagree that the OP is consistently showing no research effort?
Mar
28
comment Why do we use microwaves in microwave oven?
[..] quoted on the Q&A John linked you to, along with: "The frequency of 2.45 GHz is chosen because it falls in one of the bands not reserved for communication purposes. According to Wikipedia, the next available band would be at 5.8 GHz. A powerful magnetron working at this frequency is feasible but way too expensive for a household appliance". It seems you didn't bother to read it. :(
Mar
28
comment Why do we use microwaves in microwave oven?
@Bhavesh: What prevented you from performing basic research? Wikipedia says "The microwave frequencies used in microwave ovens are chosen based on regulatory and cost constraints" and "[higher frequencies] are not used for microwave cooking because of the very high cost of power generation at these frequencies", and this was [..]
Mar
27
comment Why is the sky of the moon always dark?
@lemon: Yes, it does.
Mar
17
comment Is it possible to watch the same distant star's supernova event twice?
This is clearly the answer. From the source you link: "One bonus is that, given the peculiar nature of gravitational lensing, astronomers can tune in for a supernova replay within the next five years. This is because light can take various paths around and through a gravitational lens, arriving at Earth at different times. Computer modeling of this lensing cluster shows that the researchers missed opportunities to see the exploding star 50 years ago and again 20 years ago, but images of the explosion will likely repeat again in a few years."