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location India
age 21
visits member for 1 year, 6 months
seen Jul 18 at 14:27

A Physics Undegrad; Also interested in Mathematics, Computer Science and Applications and English Literature.


May
22
comment Principle of Caratheodory and The Second Law of Thermodynamics
I would definitely look it up. Thank you. This discussion has been very helpful.
May
22
comment Principle of Caratheodory and The Second Law of Thermodynamics
I still can't see how the concept of increase of entropy comes out of this for an irreversible process. ( I'm getting the feeling that this works only for reversible processes ).
May
22
comment Principle of Caratheodory and The Second Law of Thermodynamics
Can you elaborate on point 2? How does this distinction exactly melt away?
May
22
comment Physical motivation for differentiation under the integral
Actually the examples from Quantum mechanics would show how neat (and essential) this trick is.
May
22
comment What are some good resources for learning how to apply vectors in physics?
See, what you are actually doing is taking the projection of the vector along the line joining a vertex to the center. Think along this line and you shall find the answer.
May
22
comment What are some good resources for learning how to apply vectors in physics?
It is a very simple problem. Think about the angle that B makes with the line joining the center and taking the cosine component
May
22
comment What are some good resources for learning how to apply vectors in physics?
You can post that specific problem here as a homework question and everyone can take a look.
May
22
comment What are some good resources for learning how to apply vectors in physics?
That is a very difficult question to answer. The book is a very popular one and I personally recommend it. It would be wise to download the ebook and go through it buying to see if you are comfortable with it.
May
22
comment What are some good resources for learning how to apply vectors in physics?
Carefully reading Resnick Halliday and going through solved examples and finally solving problems on your own is the only way.
Mar
24
comment Why have $n$, $\ell$, $m_\ell$, $m_s$ been picked as quantum number symbols $\mathbf{\text{in this order}}$?
The $n$ we get by solving the Schrodinger's equation for Hydrogen atom can be interpreted as the allowed Energy State.Actually it is one of the constants we use conventionally while solving the azimuthal equation. Historically, Bohr introduced n in his quantization of angular momentum postulate where n is the allowed orbit. Mathematically,$L = n{h \over 2\pi} = n\hbar$ where $n=1,2,3...$ was called the principle quantum number.Obviously, starting from Bohr's postulate we can also arrive at the expression for energy.The two thus become equivalent, in retrospect.I will make the necessary edits.
Mar
23
comment Why is my restaurant silverware magnetized?
I think that you would have to link the video here via some website like Youtube.
Mar
23
comment Why have $n$, $\ell$, $m_\ell$, $m_s$ been picked as quantum number symbols $\mathbf{\text{in this order}}$?
I think it was due to the fact that the constant in Legendre's eqaution is conventionally as written as $l(l+1)$. But this is merely a speculation.
Mar
23
comment Expectation Value of a Dynamical Variable
So, we can view expectation values of an operator as nothing but as inner products? And this follows from Operator Theory?
Mar
23
comment Expectation Value of a Dynamical Variable
Can you please elaborate on "general operator theory". Are you talking about linear algebra in general?
Mar
23
comment Expectation Value of a Dynamical Variable
So, it is alright if we talked about expectation values of observable or operator and use both the terms interchangeably?
Mar
23
comment Expectation Value of a Dynamical Variable
Can you please take a look at this.Here, not only they the represent the expectation values by the first integral (with a hat) but also calculates the expectation value of the annihilation operator $\widehat{a}$ which has no corresponding dynamical variable. (Page 6 of the pdf)
Mar
23
comment Expectation Value of a Dynamical Variable
I feel this question has addressed the issue and dismissed it just as a matter of notation but I am more interested in knowing if it is conceptually okay to talk about the expectation value of an operator rather than a dynamical variable.
Mar
23
comment Why don't the derivatives of the blackbody spectrum over frequency and wavelength match?
This link gives a good explanation. To quote "Estimated spectral shifts are caused by nonlinear frequency or wavelength 'gauge' relations to the experimentally accessible parameter (an intensity within an interval of such parameter)."
Jan
24
comment Physical Significance of Fourier Transform and Uncertainty Relationships
Though the FAQ of Stack Exchange discourages users from adding comments expressing thanks etc. I must say, this was just awesome! Thank you, very much!
Jan
1
comment First and Second Moment of Mass
Well, my textbooks says an expectation value of a random variable is the weighted average of all possible values that this random variable can take on.Mathematically,the expected value is the integral of the random variable with respect to its probability measure. And just one more doubt, what you call probability density and 'probability measure' is the same thing, I guess. Correct me if I am wrong