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visits member for 1 year, 4 months
seen Oct 31 '13 at 18:46

Sep
4
asked Mathematical form of chemical potential difference and entropy production
Mar
8
comment Does a constant of motion always imply a Hamiltonian formulation?
Thanks! I was wondering about that!
Mar
8
revised Does a constant of motion always imply a Hamiltonian formulation?
added 51 characters in body
Mar
8
comment Does a constant of motion always imply a Hamiltonian formulation?
shoot I posted this in math also and forgot to make the important edit. I want the constant of motion to be a function of all the variables in the system. I will add the edit above.
Mar
8
asked Does a constant of motion always imply a Hamiltonian formulation?
Mar
6
comment The Dual Nature of Matter
As Feynamn put it, don't worry if you don't understand QM, because no one does, not even Feynman. Meanwhile, master the math!
Mar
6
answered The Dual Nature of Matter
Mar
5
answered What are some critiques of Jaynes' approach to statistical mechanics?
Jan
27
comment Ideal gas concentration under temperature gradient
So I'm thinking that sounds good but I'm working with an ideal gas so doesn't that make the chemical potential 0 and thus not part of the discussion really? And can you possibly address the pressure component? Is it right that at equilibrium the pressure will be uniform (as you've argued for chemical potential)? If it wasn't an ideal gas, then I'd hope I could get to the solution two ways, one by doing what you have done, and the other by making the pressure argument but using the proper equation of state (no longer PV = nkT)
Jan
27
comment Ideal gas concentration under temperature gradient
precisely my thinking. except fortunately I do all my physics for fun these days so mistakes are only to learn from, not lose from!
Jan
27
comment Electric force in DNA molecule
yes exactly. be sure you realize that the forces are symmetric - the force on adenine is the same as that on thymine (this is newtons third law).
Jan
27
awarded  Supporter
Jan
27
comment Electric force in DNA molecule
that looks pretty good. assuming you only have to consider the forces due to the two hydrogen bonds (O~H and N~H), then you've done the O~H part.
Jan
27
answered Is it possible for a physical object to have a irrational length?
Jan
27
awarded  Teacher
Jan
27
answered How would you use the Euler-Lagrange equation to predict the motion of projectiles with linear (Stokes) drag (but no wind)?
Jan
27
awarded  Editor
Jan
27
revised Ideal gas concentration under temperature gradient
Trial Solution
Jan
27
asked Ideal gas concentration under temperature gradient
Jan
26
accepted Isentropic Processes