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location London, United Kingdom
age 29
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen Dec 3 '12 at 15:05

Phd student


May
6
comment On black holes, Hawking radiation and gravitational atoms
I'm a little nonplussed with the multitude of views this question has had but next-to-no votes or comments. If you find the topic interesting, please up-vote to further the questions popularity and stimulate people answering. Otherwise, any comments of your thoughts are most welcome. Any answers to part-questions would also be much appreciated.
May
6
comment A professional physics career without a degree?
Considered quantative-analyst/banking/accountancy? Of you'd need to be pretty hot at maths though..
May
6
revised On black holes, Hawking radiation and gravitational atoms
edited body; edited body
May
6
asked On black holes, Hawking radiation and gravitational atoms
May
6
awarded  Citizen Patrol
May
5
comment Do Sears Physics and Berkeley Physics Series provide intuition?
@mbq I'd appreciate your response to my comment above. Regards qftme
Apr
30
comment Can one see radioactive substances with an X-ray detector?
+1 for the logical experimentalist perspective
Apr
30
comment Can one see radioactive substances with an X-ray detector?
surely no one should make such claims without evidence..
Apr
30
comment How to calculate fuel consumption of car (mpg) from speed and accleration knowing mass, drag coeff and rolling resistance?
How do you think the $200 gadgets work? I don't feel this answers the question.
Apr
28
comment How to calculate fuel consumption of car (mpg) from speed and accleration knowing mass, drag coeff and rolling resistance?
This qustion seems a little rediculous to me; are you (for example) merely looking for a way to see how much it is costing you to push harder on the accelerator when the light goes green?? I.e. a more instantaneous mpg reading than modern cars currently offer. If so, the simlest answer would be to design a more accurate fuel level guage that took temperature and gaseous pressure in the fuel tank, as well as the actual fuel level, into account.
Apr
28
revised Do Sears Physics and Berkeley Physics Series provide intuition?
Expanded answer based on comments
Apr
28
comment Do Sears Physics and Berkeley Physics Series provide intuition?
@mbq Whilst I appreciate that the rules and regulations of this site are constructed in such a way as to further the standard and reputation thereof, I fail to see why closing a "specific" question such as this, in any way, conteracts that endeavour. To paraphrase, this question simply asks - what would be a good physics text book for a mathematician? Whilst it may be a 'soft' question, I do not feel it is at all too "specific". Answers to this could clearly aid alot of people. I therefore vote for it's re-opening (Although of course I don't currently have the reputation to do so, formally.)
Apr
28
comment Do Sears Physics and Berkeley Physics Series provide intuition?
Again despite this question's closure, I feel inclined to comment. @ted bunn Whilst generally I would agree with your sentiment, I feel that in this instance FLoP would be an appropriate read for the OP. Given that he / she is majoring in mathematics, I would surmise that an introductory physics text book would only serve to waste time for someone who could / should be able to appreciate the more obvious mathematical implications of physical equations 'at first glance.' In other cases I agree that they (the FLoP) would better suit a 'physicist' seeking deeper insight, but not in this case.
Apr
19
awarded  Teacher
Apr
19
revised Do Sears Physics and Berkeley Physics Series provide intuition?
added 35 characters in body
Apr
19
answered Do Sears Physics and Berkeley Physics Series provide intuition?
Apr
18
comment What is the difference between 'running' and 'current' quark mass?
It's because there is a 'bare mass' which is not observable, and a 'running mass' that will vary depending on how you actually make the measurement. This wiki page on running couplings (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coupling_constant#Running_coupling) doesn't appear to be very good so I'll post a better answer later when I have more time - unless someone else gets there first and saves me the trouble of course! ;)
Apr
15
comment Invariant spacetime - distance - Circular Motion
As a final teaser: what do you think would happen if one were to increase the energy of the proton (and hence also the speed), such that the circumference becomes less than the size of the proton?
Apr
15
comment Invariant spacetime - distance - Circular Motion
+1 for a good, clear answer. I would just like to add that in one of my 4th year particle physics lectures, the Professor calculated the circumference of the circle travelled by a proton circling the LHC in the frame of the proton (as if one were sitting on it.) At about 7TeV, he found that rather than the 27km circumference as measured in the lab frame (i.e. standing next to the LHC,) the proton was in fact circling a circumference of about 3m!! Unfortunately I don't has the calculation to hand but it shouldn't be too difficult to replicate.
Apr
15
comment Why is the contribution of a path in Feynmans path integral formalism $\sim e^{(i/\hbar)S[x(t)]}$
+1 for taking the time to write this up. Whether a direct answer to the OP's question or not, it is certainly related and makes for some interesting reading.