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location London, United Kingdom
age 30
visits member for 4 years, 6 months
seen Sep 4 '14 at 18:03

Phd student


May
10
comment Is it pions or gluons that mediate the strong force between nucleons?
@genneth, I completely agree, in general. The student in question however, is particularly inquisitive and specifically asked for an answer that was not 'dummed-down' due to it being too complex. One of my old Professors used to say "Simplify, simplify, but don't through the baby out the bathwater." I think in this instance, whether or not to settle on the pion model is equivalent to the baby sitting on the rim of the bath..
May
10
comment Is it pions or gluons that mediate the strong force between nucleons?
@Lubosh, Thanks. I read your answer with great interest (3 times!) Would I be correct to summerize that pion-exchange is merely a crude (non-renormalizable) approximation and it is closer to the truth to teach that it is instead just gluon exchange? (I say closer to the truth because I'm sure that if sea- and valence-quarks, and their associated PDFs, are properly taken into account the situation must be become significantly more complex.)
May
10
comment What happens if you try to freeze water in an water tight container
+1 for the great video link
May
10
comment Protons' repulsion within a nucleus
+1 for a perfectly reasonable question. I only wish I'd got an answer in before @Lubosh ;)
May
10
comment Is it pions or gluons that mediate the strong force between nucleons?
@anna I posed this question after having read @Lubosh's answer. I don't feel that it answers my question and, either way, I was kind of hoping for a slightly more expansive answer. When I get a chance I'll add an edit, containing some LaTex, that should better describe why I posted this query.
May
10
asked Is it pions or gluons that mediate the strong force between nucleons?
May
10
comment Shape of Fan Blades
'Dyson' make a blade-less fan. No idea how it works though :P
May
7
comment On black holes, Hawking radiation and gravitational atoms
@Michael Thanks for your comment, honestly I didn't mean it to come across that way. Actually I was concerned that some readers might feel too timid to comment for whatever reason. As a non-professional I would genuinely appreciate any and all thoughts / comments. That said, and having re-read my previous comment, I agree that it could have been better worded. As such, I apologize. @anna I agree with your comment also. Do you happen to know anything about how a micro black hole would decay, and how this might be observed?
May
6
comment On black holes, Hawking radiation and gravitational atoms
I'm a little nonplussed with the multitude of views this question has had but next-to-no votes or comments. If you find the topic interesting, please up-vote to further the questions popularity and stimulate people answering. Otherwise, any comments of your thoughts are most welcome. Any answers to part-questions would also be much appreciated.
May
6
comment A professional physics career without a degree?
Considered quantative-analyst/banking/accountancy? Of you'd need to be pretty hot at maths though..
May
6
revised On black holes, Hawking radiation and gravitational atoms
edited body; edited body
May
6
asked On black holes, Hawking radiation and gravitational atoms
May
6
awarded  Citizen Patrol
May
5
comment Do Sears Physics and Berkeley Physics Series provide intuition?
@mbq I'd appreciate your response to my comment above. Regards qftme
Apr
30
comment Can one see radioactive substances with an X-ray detector?
+1 for the logical experimentalist perspective
Apr
30
comment Can one see radioactive substances with an X-ray detector?
surely no one should make such claims without evidence..
Apr
30
comment How to calculate fuel consumption of car (mpg) from speed and accleration knowing mass, drag coeff and rolling resistance?
How do you think the $200 gadgets work? I don't feel this answers the question.
Apr
28
comment How to calculate fuel consumption of car (mpg) from speed and accleration knowing mass, drag coeff and rolling resistance?
This qustion seems a little rediculous to me; are you (for example) merely looking for a way to see how much it is costing you to push harder on the accelerator when the light goes green?? I.e. a more instantaneous mpg reading than modern cars currently offer. If so, the simlest answer would be to design a more accurate fuel level guage that took temperature and gaseous pressure in the fuel tank, as well as the actual fuel level, into account.
Apr
28
revised Do Sears Physics and Berkeley Physics Series provide intuition?
Expanded answer based on comments
Apr
28
comment Do Sears Physics and Berkeley Physics Series provide intuition?
@mbq Whilst I appreciate that the rules and regulations of this site are constructed in such a way as to further the standard and reputation thereof, I fail to see why closing a "specific" question such as this, in any way, conteracts that endeavour. To paraphrase, this question simply asks - what would be a good physics text book for a mathematician? Whilst it may be a 'soft' question, I do not feel it is at all too "specific". Answers to this could clearly aid alot of people. I therefore vote for it's re-opening (Although of course I don't currently have the reputation to do so, formally.)