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Feb
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comment Cosmic radiation cutoff at LOW energies?
Below 1GeV particles aren't generally considered relativistic and therefore, when they bombard our atmosphere from outer-space, they're just not normally refered to as cosmic rays. Furthmore, sub-GeV particles would very quickly thermalise in our atmosphere (Ie exhibit Brownian motion) and therefore retain no information about from where they came.
Feb
23
comment Cosmic radiation cutoff at LOW energies?
From where did you here there was a low energy cut-off? Technically, there isn't. Stable particles (alphas, protons, neutrinos etc) can have arbitarily low energies. Of course there comes a point when either; we would tend not to refer to them as cosmic rays (most would be solar wind for example), or when detector technolgy prevents us from seeing them. However, these don't really constitute as a 'cut-off' in the traditional sense of the word.
Feb
22
comment Cerenkov light - a practical calculation
@zephyr, could you perhaps type up your calculation into an answer? Allbeit approximate, I think it will be sufficient for my purposes and will therefore duly accept it.