980 reputation
210
bio website fp.optics.arizona.edu/asl/…
location Optics Sciences, Tucson, AZ
age
visits member for 1 year, 4 months
seen yesterday

I am a Ph.D. candidate in the College of Optical Sciences at the University of Arizona.

I work on polarization based remote sensing and applications to better understand meteorology, estimation theory and image science, imaging operators and ideal observers of polarimeters in the presence of noise. I am interested in statistical operators applied to classical electromagnetics, machine learning (specifically manifold learning), using learned manifolds to drive insight into complicated physical problems, and general imaging/optics problems.


Mar
30
comment What happens when a photon hits a beamsplitter?
I think I found something more along the lines I was driving at here : rrp.infim.ro/2010_62_2/art13Iovitz.pdf, it may be of interest to you (they derive the Fresnel equations purely from a QM perspective, if it is correct it answers my question in the affirmative.) Thanks for your help. In general, it is not the case that ensemble behavior implies single particle behavior, I wonder what the constraints are for this to be the case...I'm sure some mathematician has probably looked into these constraints...
Mar
30
comment What happens when a photon hits a beamsplitter?
not a bad reference, thanks. I've been introduced to ladder operators, and coherent states (by no means well versed though). My point is, many optical elements are designed to work on the ensemble not on individual photons, i.e., the polarization and beam splitting effects are from the superposition of many coherent states, so is treating the polarization for a single photon in the same way valid? This is like saying that a single photons wavefunction is equivalent to a superposition of many photons wavefunctions...if it is true, do you have any references?
Mar
30
comment What happens when a photon hits a beamsplitter?
I'm not suggesting that a beam splitter will have no effect on single photons, I'm mainly questioning the probability assumptions going from the large scale (classical , build up of coherent states) regime to the single photon regime.
Mar
30
comment What happens when a photon hits a beamsplitter?
Is this really true? I don't really study quantum light (we use classical models), but a good question is :Are the Fresnel equations valid for single photons? If so, where are the references for the proof? I always see these QM experiments where the assumption is made that both polarization optics and normal beam splitters work exactly the same for single photons...I'm doubtful of these claims, especially for polarization optics since the phenomena is a result of large scale wave interference (i.e. acting on the build up of coherent states, NOT single photons)
Mar
6
comment How is the formula derived for finding the field of view given drift time and declination of a star?
the 360 is in degrees, the earth rotates one full rotation (360 deg.) in 1 day, which is 86164 seconds. This gives you an angle for the FOV. But the star may not be perpendicular to you from the earth, so you must adjust by the cos factor. This can be derived geometrically.
Feb
10
comment Diffraction problem - How do I interpret
Use the minimum for the dark part and the maximum for the bright part...
Feb
9
revised Diffraction problem - How do I interpret
pinholes create airy patterns, slits and rectangular apertures produce since patterns
Feb
9
suggested suggested edit on Diffraction problem - How do I interpret
Jan
30
comment What does the quantum eraser experiment tells us?
Actually experimental evidence was not found until quite recently. Lamb and Scully showed that a semi-classical model works for Compton and the photo electric effect, you don't need photons. Aspect, Grangier, and Roger finally had an experiment which validated Bell's inequalities which appeared to work in 1986. However, the specific details about how the Aspect experiment was setup are lacking, and I want to know more...
Jan
28
comment What does the quantum eraser experiment tells us?
@LubošMotl You still haven't explained how the interference between the polarizers is disentangled from the quantum interference...that is my point, it apparently hasn't been adequately done via an experimental setup.
Jan
28
comment What does the quantum eraser experiment tells us?
@LubošMotl, not really. I'm not saying that light is not quantized, but suppose for a moment that light packets were detected with solid state sensors (which are quantum mechanical), then those interference patterns would still be "individual dots" caused by the sensor, NOT necessarily the photons, with the polarizers still causing the interference. Has anyone disentangled this problem?
Dec
12
awarded  Yearling
Dec
11
revised Fresnel Zones-How are they Formed?
Added clarification
Dec
11
revised Fresnel Zones-How are they Formed?
added 35 characters in body
Dec
10
answered The Goos Hanchen shift mechanism
Dec
10
answered Fresnel Zones-How are they Formed?
Apr
11
comment Does the mass point move?
This is a very good answer, and shows why sound mathematics and technical mathematical details must be paid attention...
Apr
11
comment Nonseparable Hilbert space
Probably compactness, metrizablility, and Hahn-Banach are most important. To understand those pretty much requires at least a masters in math though...
Apr
11
comment Bell's Theorem graph
Bell's theorem is basically a logical argument (as in mathematical logic) in probability theory. You do not have to use Quantum prepositions to understand it. This paper : arxiv.org/abs/1212.5214, has a figure which explains it well.
Apr
11
comment Are there theories that explain wave-particle duality?
After reading the wikipedia article about this experiment, it is amazing to me how many professional physicists still seem to mix up probability interference and classical wave interference.