990 reputation
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bio website fp.optics.arizona.edu/asl/…
location Optics Sciences, Tucson, AZ
age
visits member for 1 year, 7 months
seen Jul 28 at 4:10

I am a Ph.D. candidate in the College of Optical Sciences at the University of Arizona.

I work on polarization based remote sensing and applications to better understand meteorology, estimation theory and image science, imaging operators and ideal observers of polarimeters in the presence of noise. I am interested in statistical operators applied to classical electromagnetics, machine learning (specifically manifold learning), using learned manifolds to drive insight into complicated physical problems, and general imaging/optics problems.


Jul
25
comment Does a high energy photon experience deceleration or direction-change when it impinge into water or something due to the change of refraction index?
You should add a paragraph about electron interaction in addition to electron density. The photon-electron interaction is actually more dependent on the photon energies and the electron probability clouds and that coupling than on the density of electrons themselves. You are correct that as photons reach very high energies most materials begin to "appear more transparent."
Jun
22
comment Applying an operator to a function vs. a (ket) vector
@Jonas, mathematically this is incorrect, even tempered distributions map functions to a set of real numbers through the inner product notation (not other functions like $\psi(x)$! Tempered distributions extend linear functionals in a mathematically consistent way, so that the inner product gives numbers, not functions. If you want functions as output then you have to go to somthing like a convolution... Please, specifically show how $\psi(x)$ is a scalar in any sense of the definition...it isn't $\psi(0)$ or $\psi(x_0)$ for some specific $x_0$...scalar valued fnc $\ne$ scalar.
Jun
20
comment Applying an operator to a function vs. a (ket) vector
And math has already fleshed out all the theory needed in functional analysis in Hilbert and Banach spaces in a rigorous way so it isn't as if it needs to be reinvented...it has already been done in math...
Jun
20
comment Applying an operator to a function vs. a (ket) vector
@Socob, think of $\psi$ like some object in some space, maybe a spiky ball or something in 3-d. Then yes $\langle x | \psi \rangle$ is the scaler part of the projection onto the $x$-axis. This is a really poor part of the bra-ket notation and the subsequent abuse by physicists, really it should be more like $\psi(x) = \langle x | \psi \rangle | x \rangle$. I learned this stuff coming from math and it drove me crazy too...
Jun
20
comment Is there a cheap way I can do a Bell inequality experiment?
You may be interested in this page : people.whitman.edu/~beckmk/QM and advlab.org/pdf/imm2013_Beck_qo_parts_list_Jan_2012.pdf
Jun
20
comment Applying an operator to a function vs. a (ket) vector
The bra-ket notation is literally defining an inner product on whatever underlying vector space is being used, i.e. $\langle x | \psi(x) \rangle$ is the inner product of the vector $x$ and $\psi(x)$. The individual notation is useful when using operators (look into some Functional Analysis, Riesz Rep. Thm). For vectors, the bras and kets represent the same objects, but for operators they have a different meaning (because of the Riesz Thm), so that is where they become useful.
Jun
20
comment Thin Film Interference in Fluid Dynamics: Many are welcome to throw ideas in here, Please!
Sean, you seem to be correct, but I think this answer could use some improvement, like use a diagram to explain why the white light is interfering in the thin film waveguide, etc.
Jun
20
comment Understanding What A Wakefield Describes?
I'm not completely clear on what system you are analyzing (more math please), but for the integration you would only have one integral, and you would need to transform your function of $\theta$ to a function of s or z.
Jun
10
comment Understanding frequency of a signal
This should help : physics.smu.edu/scalise/P5337fa11/notes/ch06/chapter6.pdf...
Jun
10
comment Do negative numbers have any physical meaning?
But things like geometric symmetry relations really do have negative representations often, rotations for instance (you can rotate one way or the opposite way, or representations of transformations like rotoinversion...and these geometric properties are the basis of a lot of physics...
Jun
10
comment What's the difference between cyclotron radiation and synchrotron radiation?
I'll have to find my class notes, but I seem to recall that cyclotron was non-relativistic, and synchrotron was relativistic. The more relativistic, the more coherence in the output beam (more "laser like"), this effect is also increased by "wigglers" I believe they were called...
Jun
10
comment Image formation at surface of water
Are you asking about the condition where the ray propagates along the surface, or just the condition where the observer is at an angle where TIR would occur?
Mar
30
comment What happens when a photon hits a beamsplitter?
I think I found something more along the lines I was driving at here : rrp.infim.ro/2010_62_2/art13Iovitz.pdf, it may be of interest to you (they derive the Fresnel equations purely from a QM perspective, if it is correct it answers my question in the affirmative.) Thanks for your help. In general, it is not the case that ensemble behavior implies single particle behavior, I wonder what the constraints are for this to be the case...I'm sure some mathematician has probably looked into these constraints...
Mar
30
comment What happens when a photon hits a beamsplitter?
not a bad reference, thanks. I've been introduced to ladder operators, and coherent states (by no means well versed though). My point is, many optical elements are designed to work on the ensemble not on individual photons, i.e., the polarization and beam splitting effects are from the superposition of many coherent states, so is treating the polarization for a single photon in the same way valid? This is like saying that a single photons wavefunction is equivalent to a superposition of many photons wavefunctions...if it is true, do you have any references?
Mar
30
comment What happens when a photon hits a beamsplitter?
I'm not suggesting that a beam splitter will have no effect on single photons, I'm mainly questioning the probability assumptions going from the large scale (classical , build up of coherent states) regime to the single photon regime.
Mar
30
comment What happens when a photon hits a beamsplitter?
Is this really true? I don't really study quantum light (we use classical models), but a good question is :Are the Fresnel equations valid for single photons? If so, where are the references for the proof? I always see these QM experiments where the assumption is made that both polarization optics and normal beam splitters work exactly the same for single photons...I'm doubtful of these claims, especially for polarization optics since the phenomena is a result of large scale wave interference (i.e. acting on the build up of coherent states, NOT single photons)
Mar
6
comment How is the formula derived for finding the field of view given drift time and declination of a star?
the 360 is in degrees, the earth rotates one full rotation (360 deg.) in 1 day, which is 86164 seconds. This gives you an angle for the FOV. But the star may not be perpendicular to you from the earth, so you must adjust by the cos factor. This can be derived geometrically.
Feb
10
comment Diffraction problem - How do I interpret
Use the minimum for the dark part and the maximum for the bright part...
Feb
9
revised Diffraction problem - How do I interpret
pinholes create airy patterns, slits and rectangular apertures produce since patterns
Feb
9
suggested suggested edit on Diffraction problem - How do I interpret