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Jan
28
awarded  Yearling
Jan
22
comment Why don't antiparticles have antispin?
@ACuriousMind: Wouldn't a change in P (=parity?) imply spinning backwards?
Jan
22
asked Why don't antiparticles have antispin?
Jan
14
comment Why is the Fourier transform more useful than the Hartley transform in physics?
@Daniel Sank: Thank you. Actually I was expecting somebody to say something along the line that a optical lens performs a Fourier transformation and not(?) a Hartley transformation, and that is why Fourier is more "physical". But your edit is very interesting, too.
Jan
12
comment Why is the Fourier transform more useful than the Hartley transform in physics?
I would love if someone could address this part of the question: "Are their any properties that make the Fourier transformation more "physical"?" .
Jan
12
comment Why is the Fourier transform more useful than the Hartley transform in physics?
@DanielSank I know that hermitian means, that the operator has real eigenvalues. What confuses me is that an operator involving the imaginary unit like $i (d/dt)$ can in fact have real eigenvalues. But maybe this leads to far away from the original question. Maybe I ask another question about this. Thank you.
Jan
11
comment Why is the Fourier transform more useful than the Hartley transform in physics?
@DanielSank Isn't the eigenvector of $(d/dt)$ simply the real exponential function $e^{x}$ ? Why is the exponential function with a complex argument be used for the Fourier transformation?
Jan
9
comment Why is the Fourier transform more useful than the Hartley transform in physics?
I think it is interesting to note that when looking at second derivatives both kernels show again the same behaviour: $(d^2/dt^2) \text{cas}(\omega t) = -\omega^2 \text{cas}(\omega t)$ and $(d^2/dt^2)\exp(i\omega t) = - \omega^2 \exp(i \omega t)$
Jan
9
asked Why is the Fourier transform more useful than the Hartley transform in physics?
Dec
16
awarded  Notable Question
Nov
19
accepted Polarization of light for a fast moving observer
Nov
13
answered Is temperature a Lorentz invariant in relativity?
Oct
2
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
21
awarded  Notable Question
Sep
17
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
5
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
2
comment Is the universe a Turing machine?
Do you have a reference that shows, that classical mechanics is non-computable?
Aug
31
asked Is the universe a Turing machine?
Aug
16
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
18
accepted Is John Nash's “Interesting Equation” really interesting?