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Apr
21
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
18
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
16
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
13
accepted Are path integrals integrals with countable or uncountable infinite dimensions?
Mar
12
awarded  Nice Question
Mar
10
comment The central limit theorem from a path integral?
I agree it is not really a physics question. But it seems to me that in general physicists know much more about functional integration and path integrals than mathematicians, so I though I ask the question here.
Mar
10
asked The central limit theorem from a path integral?
Mar
10
comment Are path integrals integrals with countable or uncountable infinite dimensions?
So path integrals are understood as having uncountable/continuous infinite dimensions?
Feb
29
asked Are path integrals integrals with countable or uncountable infinite dimensions?
Feb
24
comment Why a day is divided by 12/24 hours? Why the number 12?
In fact 12 is the fifth en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Highly_composite_number.
Feb
11
comment Speed of gravity within a mass
Does this mean that refraction of gravitational waves by matter is also not detectable?
Feb
8
comment What is the opposite of quantization?
@CuriousOne: Why do you not write another answer then?
Feb
8
comment What is the opposite of quantization?
Bohr said, that the angular momentum should be multiples of Planck's constant: $L = n\hbar$. So if $L$ is taken as a constant taking the quantum number $n \rightarrow \infty$ basically implies $\hbar \rightarrow 0$ . Doesn't that mean that both statements are basically equivalent?
Feb
7
asked What is the opposite of quantization?
Feb
7
accepted Is the polarization of light changed by gravity?
Feb
7
comment What is the point of complex fields in classical field theory?
That you for the link to the notes of Sidney Coleman. These are really helpful.
Feb
7
accepted What is the point of complex fields in classical field theory?
Feb
7
comment What is polarisation, spin, helicity, chirality and parity?
What about polarization?
Feb
7
comment Does a set of eigenvalues in QM correspond to a random variable in statistics?
Sorry, I overlooked this clear statement in the wall of text by Moretti: "As a matter of fact, a maximal set of pairwise commuting projectors has formal properties identical to those of classical logic: is a Boolean σ-algebra."
Feb
6
comment Does a set of eigenvalues in QM correspond to a random variable in statistics?
But ValterMoretti is talking about measurements of two observables (which as I understand don't commute in QM in general). That is not what I'm asking about. My question is much simpler and only concerns the measurement of a single observable.