6,099 reputation
1643
bio website jfitzsimons.org
location Singapore, Singapore
age 32
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen Dec 6 '13 at 16:11

I have just moved to the Center for Quantum Technologies in Singapore, after spending the last 3 years as a Merton College JRF in Theoretical Physics and a Senior Research Fellow in Oxford University Department of Materials. My research focuses largely on theoretical aspects of quantum information processing. In particular I am interested in spin networks, measurement based computation, cryptography and computational complexity.


Jan
20
comment Can anybody provide a simple example of a quantum computer algorithm?
"Now, a quantum computer isn't just a parallel processor, where you can give it a superposition of the configurations and get back f evaluated on all of them." Actually, it isn't -even- a parallel processor. Quantum parallelism is not the same as having an exponentially parallel classical computer, although an exponentially parallel classical computer can simulate a quantum computer efficiently.
Jan
20
answered Can anybody provide a simple example of a quantum computer algorithm?
Jan
19
revised Where's the best place to add weight to a Pinewood Derby car?
Fixed a typo
Jan
19
comment Where's the best place to add weight to a Pinewood Derby car?
@Colin: I did so just before you posted that comment, so I guess you were already typing when I did the update.
Jan
19
revised Where's the best place to add weight to a Pinewood Derby car?
deleted 1830 characters in body
Jan
19
comment Where's the best place to add weight to a Pinewood Derby car?
I've updated my answer below.
Jan
19
revised Where's the best place to add weight to a Pinewood Derby car?
added 1298 characters in body
Jan
19
comment Where's the best place to add weight to a Pinewood Derby car?
Ah I see, well in that case there may be a small advantage to placing it towards the rear. I must admit, I somewhat misunderstood what a pinewood derby car is. I would imagine in that setting, however, that friction will play a much bigger role (and to a small extent aerodynamics).
Jan
19
comment Where's the best place to add weight to a Pinewood Derby car?
Ah ok, so in that case most of the handling concerns are not an issue, so it is less important where you place it but you will still maximize stability by placing it in this position.
Jan
19
comment Where's the best place to add weight to a Pinewood Derby car?
@Mark E: Actually there is only that effect if the finish line is on level ground.
Jan
19
answered Where's the best place to add weight to a Pinewood Derby car?
Jan
19
comment What is the statistical likelihood of getting a job as a theoretical physicist?
Further, I agree entirely with @Matt that research grad students are also researchers. One difference, however, is that being a postdoc is a job in a way that being a graduate student isn't (whether funded or not). TP postdocs are very clearly professional theoretical physicists.
Jan
19
comment What is the statistical likelihood of getting a job as a theoretical physicist?
@Noldorin: I do not agree at all. It is an entirely objective fact that postdocs are researchers. They get paid to spend all day doing research. In TP this research is very usually independent, and while the direction of research may depend on the funding sources involved, this is true of all researchers. If you get a grant to study some area, then you are expected to do so whether a postdoc or a fellow of the Royal Society. Almost all postdocs have a number of papers to their name (and often very many) and many supervise students. I can't see any way in which they arn't proper researchers.
Jan
18
comment What is the statistical likelihood of getting a job as a theoretical physicist?
Wow,wow,wow. TP postdocs can legitimately call themselves theoretical physicists.
Jan
18
comment Is there any thing other than time that “triggers” a radioactive atom to decay?
@Lubos: Thanks.
Jan
18
comment Is there any thing other than time that “triggers” a radioactive atom to decay?
@Omega: nope, the particle in a box model isn't a good analogy here as there -are- hidden variables in that case: the position and momentum of the atom.
Jan
18
comment Is there any thing other than time that “triggers” a radioactive atom to decay?
@dmckee: I said it was -not- an intrinsic property, and I had hidden variables specifically in mind. As regards the increased probability, your point is exactly the reason for the disclaimer immediately following it. To explain it properly would require quite a technical discussion about nuclear structure and interaction cross-sections.
Jan
18
revised Is there any thing other than time that “triggers” a radioactive atom to decay?
added 516 characters in body
Jan
18
answered Is there any thing other than time that “triggers” a radioactive atom to decay?
Jan
18
comment Home experiments to derive the speed of light?
I would imagine it simply uses the falloff in illumination to measure distance. That seems far easier than timing pulses.