108 reputation
7
bio website john.jersdesk.com
location North Salt Lake, UT
age 43
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen yesterday

I am a software developer. I am particularly fond of the areas:

  • artificial intelligence, computer vision & machine learning
  • high end graphics & image processing
  • games

As this profile is now posted across multiple sites:

I am a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, also known as a Mormon.
I am also a mathematician.
I quite like interesting games and enjoy playing them with those of my many wonderful children who are old enough. We will often edit what we might find to be sleazy in a game without altering the game play, which quite widens the range of games we can play while staying within what we consider to be gospel standards.


Mar
11
awarded  Benefactor
Mar
6
comment The shape of speaker cones
I am uncertain about the reasoning in the first reference. The second reference seems to be written by a student who has studied the matter seriously and is much better. According to the second reference, originally simple cones were used primarily because they avoided buckling. Elements that are meant to cover a wide frequency range are curved however, and it is no small matter to find curves that work well. There was some discussion of depth of the cone and height of the cone I haven't gone over yet.
Mar
5
awarded  Promoter
Mar
5
awarded  Scholar
Mar
5
accepted The physics of sound boards
Mar
3
comment The physics of sound boards
Having had time to think about it I think this explains why type of sound made becomes that of the soundboard, i.e. the harmonics of the better soundmaker dominate. But I think Olin is onto something. If one were to use the voilin to drive the string instead one would get a greater response at the strings resonating frequencies, but it would not cause the violin to produce a much louder sound at those frequencies.
Mar
3
comment The physics of sound boards
Way less than that of the string. In fact, it needs to not only be physically smaller, but be much lower energy. Part of what would need to be the case is that in fact many soundmakers generate soundwaves incredibly inefficiently. Otherwise the transfer to the soundboard would not be so beneficial.
Mar
2
comment The physics of sound boards
Your point about "the energy not being dissipated in the soundboard itself" is well made, as well as harmonics in air cavities. I think your point is the soundboard makes much physically smaller and lower energy vibrations (which is the drag and energy loss to the string), but those very low energy vibrations of the soundboard do a much better job of creating waves in the air, as most of the vibrating objects motion through the air goes to turbulent noise, very little contributing to the coherent sound wave. Correct? Certainly I think that is believable for a vibrating string.
Mar
2
comment The physics of sound boards
Oh, I know. Teaching a semester of PDE included working out the harmonic states of a hollow sphere. Cool stuff, for sure.
Mar
2
comment The physics of sound boards
If this is the major mechanism, then the proportion decrease in the time the tuning fork vibrates should correspond pretty well to the amplitude of the soundwave. I am a little dubious about that, because human ear responses are (coarsely) logarithmic, so a very audible increase in volume should correspond to a quite substantial increase in wave amplitude. That should mean the tuning fork should go quiet in a small fraction of the time that it did without the soundboard. I agree your answer is a physical factor. I am not sure it is the dominant factor. Feel free to correct me if I am wrong.
Mar
2
comment The physics of sound boards
If this is the primary mechanism, then soundboards only work at frequencies for which they have harmonics. Is that true?
Feb
22
revised The physics of sound boards
added 15 characters in body
Feb
22
awarded  Editor
Feb
22
revised The physics of sound boards
added 122 characters in body
Feb
22
awarded  Student
Feb
22
asked The shape of speaker cones
Feb
22
asked The physics of sound boards
Jan
11
awarded  Supporter
Jan
27
awarded  Autobiographer