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comment about to create a standing wave
For example, the optical lattice stated in en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Optical_lattice, is using two counterprogating laser beam to form the standing wave. Since $\cos(\omega t)$ will be there as a result of the amplitude-modulated standing wave, so I think $\omega$ is the resonance frequency between any two atomic levels which the laser beam operating to, isn't it? Usually, will $\omega$ be so high? And if so, the amplitude of the standing wave is modulated in such high frequency, can we consider it (amplitude) as a constant instead of modulation?
Jan
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comment about to create a standing wave
Thanks a lot. It is clear now. But another question just comes up to me. If people use the laser to create the optical standing wave, so the term $\cos\omega t$ that modulate the amplitude is related to the frequency of the laser? Since the frequency is so high, what do we see for optical standing wave then?