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visits member for 1 year, 11 months
seen Oct 17 at 2:54

Sep
18
comment How do you add temperatures?
It would appear that you were meant to use an interpolation, but I'd ask your colleagues to confirm this (for example there might be a specific type of interpolation that is required)
Jan
21
comment Is it possible to project an image onto water?
why does it "need" to be projected inside the liquid? If you're trying to achieve a 3D effect, you can look into holograms. Also there are techniques to make things appear as if they're projected within the solid. But light will continue going along a straight line unless it encounters a change in n, or a scattering point
Jan
20
comment Overview and doubts about Bloch's theorem and the concept of partial density of states
About the pDOS, lets see if I get this: pDOS is a density of state, meaning that it's a graph showing how many energy states there are at a particular energy. However, to each energy state there corresponds an actual wavefunction (eigenvalue - eigenfunction pair). This wavefunction can be written as a linear sum of spherical functions (the s, p, d). So I can go back to my DOS and plot the four, five points corresponding to how much of each basis function I have. Doing this for all energies, I get continuous lines. Is this right?
Jan
20
comment Overview and doubts about Bloch's theorem and the concept of partial density of states
Continuing about the Bloch's theorem: what if we have a quasicrystal? i.e. an ordered lattice that does not have translation symmetry. Is Bloch's theorem still apply?
Jan
17
comment Do my noodles cook quicker when the water is boiling or when it is just about to boil?
Noodles aren't cooked when they're hot. They're cooked when they're wet - when water has thoroughly diffused into the starch. The cooking time is the time required for water to diffuse into the noodle. Diffusion is greater at high temperatures, and the total water flux into the noodle requires a large contacting surface.
Jan
16
comment What happens to a conducting ring when exposed to an electric field?
But why would they want to travel in the direction opposite the electric field that separated to begin with? I mean, if the field is AC, sure. But with DC?
Jan
16
comment Can an Anti nuclear atom be synthesised so it can neutralise the effect of nuclear atom
I hate to say this (I hate failing students), but you have some fundamental misunderstanding of physics possibly informed by a misreading of mysticism. There is no "nuclear" atom because nuclear is an adjective solely to describe technology. Rather, atoms have a "nucleus", a noun, as a necessary component. "The chain" cannot be neutralized because it is not a noun, but a verb to describe the actions of atoms and neutrons in a critical mass. At best it can be "stopped", by lowering control rods in a reactor, or if a bomb fizzles.
Jan
16
comment What happens to a conducting ring when exposed to an electric field?
If the charges are static, why would they jump (I'm interpreting "jump" to mean that the charges recombine by arcing)? Unless you mean that the charges escape the material to continue travelling along the direction of the E field.
Dec
14
comment Intuitive explanation for why same force applied farther from a hinge causes larger angular acceleration than if applied closer?
I was going to add that force isn't a conserved quantity, and the implications. But you had that covered too.
Dec
11
comment Relation between voltage and current
This is no longer a physics questions, but a biological one. However consider that your muscles probably wouldn't appreciate being yanked in opposite directions at 60 times a second or 10. But the physiological response vs. frequency is not something I can answer.
Dec
11
comment Relation between voltage and current
@xish Of course not. But the external V doesn't matter. The only thing that matters is the voltage drop across your heart, and that DOES depend on your skin's resistance
Dec
11
comment Relation between voltage and current
@RahulChitta the external voltage applied is the sum of the voltage drop along the path of the current. In particular your skin CAN be an excellent insulator and therefore most of the voltage drop will be across it.
Dec
9
comment Largest theoretically possible specific heat capacity?
Zustanssumme is partition function in English which is related to, but not the same thing, as degrees of freedom. Assuming you speak German, Freiheitsgrad is a translation for degree of freedom (according to wikipedia, the infallible source of information)
Sep
10
comment Can peridynamics give accurate quantitative results?
Sorry for the late reply. I have not been told explicitly what the materials will be, but I've inferred its for composite materials. I don't think they've given "time accuracy" much thought, but I think it's crucial. Finally, I'm still studying the fundamentals of the method, and have not read up on the cutting edge.
Jun
2
comment starlight flux on earth
Lv is a log2 scale where lv 0 is defined as the light necessary to take a photo with f 1.0 t=1 ISO 100
Jun
2
comment starlight flux on earth
I was wondering where to ask, but I figured its a physics question because I want a flux value from the celestial bodies and I can figure out the rest.
Apr
12
comment Computer cooling with dry ice, ideas and question; thermodynamics
CO2 is what's responsible for that chocking feeling. N2, CO, CH4, they'll asphyxiate or intoxicate you gracefully.
Apr
11
comment Heat of adsorption from fugacity data
I want $\Delta H$, but the equation above requires constant loading, which I don't have. Instead I have the loading as a function of T and P. The information of $\Delta H$ should be within my data, but I don't know how to extract it.
Nov
19
comment First order phase transition in a classical system
Thank you. Sorry for being nitpicky, but I've always liked the "seams" problems in science.
Nov
19
comment First order phase transition in a classical system
Very interesting Arnold. My question, I guess, is more about the seam between theory and reality. I can imagine a theoretical system having a discontinuity at it's nth derivative, just like I can imagine a set of (classical) atoms standing perfectly still and achieving 0K. What happens when I add features to the model? Let's say I have a finite set of (classical) atoms at 0K in a rigid box larger than their crystal volume. I start to heat the atoms. Will the jump in Cv be perfectly discontinuous? Won't vacancies (holes) enter the solid and act like a "second component"?