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Oct
22
comment When a planet is heated through gravitational pull, where is the energy taken from?
I don't think Jupiter would stop rotating. For one, it would violate the conservation of angular momentum. Instead, the Jupiter's rotation and the moons' orbits and rotations will become such that rate of change is zero. Of course, this ignores that Jupiter is a body in the solar system.
Sep
18
comment How do you add temperatures?
It would appear that you were meant to use an interpolation, but I'd ask your colleagues to confirm this (for example there might be a specific type of interpolation that is required)
Aug
27
awarded  Yearling
Aug
27
answered How do you add temperatures?
Jan
25
awarded  Informed
Jan
21
comment Is it possible to project an image onto water?
why does it "need" to be projected inside the liquid? If you're trying to achieve a 3D effect, you can look into holograms. Also there are techniques to make things appear as if they're projected within the solid. But light will continue going along a straight line unless it encounters a change in n, or a scattering point
Jan
20
answered Is it possible to project an image onto water?
Jan
20
revised Overview and doubts about Bloch's theorem and the concept of partial density of states
added 6 characters in body
Jan
20
accepted Overview and doubts about Bloch's theorem and the concept of partial density of states
Jan
20
comment Overview and doubts about Bloch's theorem and the concept of partial density of states
About the pDOS, lets see if I get this: pDOS is a density of state, meaning that it's a graph showing how many energy states there are at a particular energy. However, to each energy state there corresponds an actual wavefunction (eigenvalue - eigenfunction pair). This wavefunction can be written as a linear sum of spherical functions (the s, p, d). So I can go back to my DOS and plot the four, five points corresponding to how much of each basis function I have. Doing this for all energies, I get continuous lines. Is this right?
Jan
20
comment Overview and doubts about Bloch's theorem and the concept of partial density of states
Continuing about the Bloch's theorem: what if we have a quasicrystal? i.e. an ordered lattice that does not have translation symmetry. Is Bloch's theorem still apply?
Jan
17
comment Do my noodles cook quicker when the water is boiling or when it is just about to boil?
Noodles aren't cooked when they're hot. They're cooked when they're wet - when water has thoroughly diffused into the starch. The cooking time is the time required for water to diffuse into the noodle. Diffusion is greater at high temperatures, and the total water flux into the noodle requires a large contacting surface.
Jan
16
awarded  Critic
Jan
16
comment What happens to a conducting ring when exposed to an electric field?
But why would they want to travel in the direction opposite the electric field that separated to begin with? I mean, if the field is AC, sure. But with DC?
Jan
16
comment Can an Anti nuclear atom be synthesised so it can neutralise the effect of nuclear atom
I hate to say this (I hate failing students), but you have some fundamental misunderstanding of physics possibly informed by a misreading of mysticism. There is no "nuclear" atom because nuclear is an adjective solely to describe technology. Rather, atoms have a "nucleus", a noun, as a necessary component. "The chain" cannot be neutralized because it is not a noun, but a verb to describe the actions of atoms and neutrons in a critical mass. At best it can be "stopped", by lowering control rods in a reactor, or if a bomb fizzles.
Jan
16
comment What happens to a conducting ring when exposed to an electric field?
If the charges are static, why would they jump (I'm interpreting "jump" to mean that the charges recombine by arcing)? Unless you mean that the charges escape the material to continue travelling along the direction of the E field.
Jan
16
answered Dissolving oxygen into water
Jan
16
answered Why does ice have a lower density than water?
Jan
16
asked Overview and doubts about Bloch's theorem and the concept of partial density of states
Jan
16
revised A problem of missing energy when charging a second capacitor
edited body