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seen Mar 10 at 22:22

Feb
24
answered My physics teacher gave us this equation $v= -3 +3t$
Feb
23
comment Why isn't temperature measured in Joules?
What I mean is that it's wordy to say T in Joules, in the same manner that it is wordy to give an airplane's airspeed in milimeters/year. eV, an energy unit like Joule, would be better and I would be the first to welcome it so we can start dropping R and k.
Feb
3
comment Where did earth's electric charge come from?
You're not measuring a charge with a voltmeter, you're measuring the potential difference due to a current of charge. The Earth can be neutral and still have ground currents.
Dec
11
revised Computer cooling with dry ice, ideas and question; thermodynamics
added 204 characters in body
Dec
11
comment Computer cooling with dry ice, ideas and question; thermodynamics
@Aron I modified the answer accordingly. However, if we take the question/answer too seriously, it should be re-posted on a chemical engineering exchange. Any extreme cooling will cause condensation, although the ethanol in my solution should absorb quite a bit of water.
Nov
8
awarded  Necromancer
Oct
22
comment When a planet is heated through gravitational pull, where is the energy taken from?
I don't think Jupiter would stop rotating. For one, it would violate the conservation of angular momentum. Instead, the Jupiter's rotation and the moons' orbits and rotations will become such that rate of change is zero. Of course, this ignores that Jupiter is a body in the solar system.
Sep
18
comment How do you add temperatures?
It would appear that you were meant to use an interpolation, but I'd ask your colleagues to confirm this (for example there might be a specific type of interpolation that is required)
Aug
27
awarded  Yearling
Aug
27
answered How do you add temperatures?
Jan
25
awarded  Informed
Jan
21
comment Is it possible to project an image onto water?
why does it "need" to be projected inside the liquid? If you're trying to achieve a 3D effect, you can look into holograms. Also there are techniques to make things appear as if they're projected within the solid. But light will continue going along a straight line unless it encounters a change in n, or a scattering point
Jan
20
answered Is it possible to project an image onto water?
Jan
20
revised Overview and doubts about Bloch's theorem and the concept of partial density of states
added 6 characters in body
Jan
20
accepted Overview and doubts about Bloch's theorem and the concept of partial density of states
Jan
20
comment Overview and doubts about Bloch's theorem and the concept of partial density of states
About the pDOS, lets see if I get this: pDOS is a density of state, meaning that it's a graph showing how many energy states there are at a particular energy. However, to each energy state there corresponds an actual wavefunction (eigenvalue - eigenfunction pair). This wavefunction can be written as a linear sum of spherical functions (the s, p, d). So I can go back to my DOS and plot the four, five points corresponding to how much of each basis function I have. Doing this for all energies, I get continuous lines. Is this right?
Jan
20
comment Overview and doubts about Bloch's theorem and the concept of partial density of states
Continuing about the Bloch's theorem: what if we have a quasicrystal? i.e. an ordered lattice that does not have translation symmetry. Is Bloch's theorem still apply?
Jan
17
comment Do my noodles cook quicker when the water is boiling or when it is just about to boil?
Noodles aren't cooked when they're hot. They're cooked when they're wet - when water has thoroughly diffused into the starch. The cooking time is the time required for water to diffuse into the noodle. Diffusion is greater at high temperatures, and the total water flux into the noodle requires a large contacting surface.
Jan
16
awarded  Critic
Jan
16
comment What happens to a conducting ring when exposed to an electric field?
But why would they want to travel in the direction opposite the electric field that separated to begin with? I mean, if the field is AC, sure. But with DC?