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seen Nov 15 '12 at 14:38

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accepted Is physics rigorous in the mathematical sense?
Nov
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comment Is physics rigorous in the mathematical sense?
I do feel that most of the axioms in mathematics are so intuitive and self-evident like 1+1=2, etc etc, except for the axiom of mathematical induction, and euclid's 5th axiom. Then again, I am just beginning my undergraduate studies, so I haven't seen much of what there is to see. Are there similar, self-avident axioms in Physics too?
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comment Is physics rigorous in the mathematical sense?
I see, that is a very helpful answer Stan! I will check out the lecture. However, is there absolutely no way, in no area of Physics, can we apply the idea of Axiom-Definition-Speculation-Theorem-Proof structure of mathematics?
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comment Is physics rigorous in the mathematical sense?
If we are going to build Physics from ground-up, then there should be a set of axioms that we should lay by, isn't it? Or else, we could be building Physics on unstable structures. There is a famous saying, whom I forgotten the author, by which he says that, the idea of a proof is to prove beyond doubt, your own argument.
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revised Is physics rigorous in the mathematical sense?
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Nov
14
comment Is physics rigorous in the mathematical sense?
It is not inherently rigorous.. That is, you may try an experiment and get the same result that verifies your equation for 1 million times, but who knows, chances are still that the 1 millionth 1 time could prove you wrong. Can we prove beyond doubt, equations in physics?
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asked Is physics rigorous in the mathematical sense?