6,389 reputation
1932
bio website pantheon.yale.edu/~pwm22
location New Haven, CT
age 57
visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen Oct 17 at 13:35

I'm slowly understanding quantum field theory. I believe I understand non-interacting quantum fields pretty well, I would say as a formalism for real signal analysis, and their relationship to classical random fields, but the mathematics and understanding of interacting quantum fields is harder.

As a manifesto for PhysicsSE, I would say that research in Physics is a cooperative endeavour, in which productive failures are sometimes better for us than apparent successes. Sometimes seeing what is productive takes the ingenuity of many people and many years.


Oct
6
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Jul
2
awarded  Inquisitive
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Apr
3
awarded  Nice Question
Feb
18
awarded  Custodian
Feb
18
reviewed Approve suggested edit on How does one measure the frequency of a laser?
Jan
25
awarded  Yearling
Dec
20
awarded  Enlightened
Dec
20
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
14
awarded  Good Answer
Oct
18
awarded  Nice Question
Aug
18
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
14
comment Maxwell's equations in microscopic and macroscopic forms, and quantization
@Cristi I more-or-less saw that as your motivation. I've now thought about it more, so that I think it's clear that the indefinite metric makes a useful decomposition not possible unless some additional structure is introduced (so, what other structure would be natural in your context?). The Fourier transform (or CST equivalent) is fairly natural in physics; a restriction to the forward light-cone is natural for QM, and a restriction to both forward and backward light-cones is possible, albeit not a well-established choice, in classical physics (eg, in Stochastic ElectroDynamics).
Jul
13
revised Maxwell's equations in microscopic and macroscopic forms, and quantization
added 466 characters in body
Jul
13
comment Maxwell's equations in microscopic and macroscopic forms, and quantization
@Cristi The modification I have made to the question is very physics-y and is a spur of the moment construction, but it might be possible to work it up into proper mathematics. Thank you (a lot) for your comment.
Jul
13
comment Maxwell's equations in microscopic and macroscopic forms, and quantization
@Cristi I'm not competent to answer your mathoverflow question, and, looking at this in the light of your comment, I can't use Hodge decomposition here [I see now that I misread an informal statement in a graduate-level book on Riemannian geometry that I was using]. I have edited the question to reflect this.
Jun
23
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
18
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
10
awarded  Enlightened