348 reputation
111
bio website users.ntua.gr/ge05032
location Athens, Greece
age 26
visits member for 1 year, 5 months
seen Feb 23 at 10:39

I have just(October 2012) finished my undergraduate studies in Applied Physics(D.Sc., D.Eng.) at National Technical University of Athens(NTUA). My thesis was about the MicroMEGAS detector where I constructed, studied, simulated and analysed data. I have enrolled(October 2012) in a M.Sc. programm called Physics and Technological Applications (NTUA) and I hope to continue with a Ph.D.

My working experience includes 7 years student's tutoring(university,high school, primary school), 1 year of developing laser systems on behalf of the NTUA Laser Group, 1 year of detector studies on behalf of the NTUA High Energy Physics Group(HEP-NTUA) and a month working at CERN on behalf of the RD51 collaboration, in detector RnD.

My future plans include Ph.D studies in the USA or Europe in the field of experimental Physics(I should decide on which particular field), marrying my girlfriend and working in research.

Other interests include culinary, pastry, photography, basketball, cinema, completing tutorial in various fields and computing.


Feb
23
comment Dead time in data acquisition
That is really a nice approach! Let the user chose! I think that is very fair! An estimation of a silicon detector dead time? How to measure or estimate the dead time of a detector?(If you agree, I can post it as a new question).
Feb
21
comment Dead time in data acquisition
Thank you very much for your answer! It is really educative. The thing is that I need a rough estimate of the whole system's dead time. Reading your answer, I think that the computation of dead time, by dividing live time with real time, while multiplying by a roughly estimated factor(of 3 for instance) would be a way to estimate system's dead time. Do you think that this would work?
Feb
21
accepted Dead time in data acquisition
Feb
20
comment Dead time in data acquisition
I can agree to that. The thing is I cannot find a way to show to the user the system's dead time which includes detectors, electronics and software.
Feb
20
comment Dead time in data acquisition
@JohnRennie: Exactly! The thing is I cannot measure that time. I can measure how long my measurement is on(real time) an how long does my system records(live time). Is it correct to say so?
Feb
20
asked Dead time in data acquisition
Feb
19
comment Why apply voltage on an Si detector only on atmosphere or high vacuum
Exactly! That's my question! There isn't air inside the detector or the cable, is there? The only air that exists is between the detector case(which is in 0 potential) and the vacuum chamber(which is also in 0 potential). So where would the dielectric breakdown occur?
Feb
19
comment Why apply voltage on an Si detector only on atmosphere or high vacuum
@ChrisMueller : Thank you very much for your answer! Very interesting answer!!! However, there is something I don't understand... My Si detector has only one cable, where the voltage is applied. Where will the spark occur? Between the detectors frame(i.e. ground) and the cable's central core?
Feb
18
comment Why apply voltage on an Si detector only on atmosphere or high vacuum
@ChrisMueller : Thank's for your comment! I want to use it on $10^{-1}$ Torr. It's not atmosphere and definitely it's not high vacuum!
Feb
18
comment Why apply voltage on an Si detector only on atmosphere or high vacuum
@CarlWitthoft : Thank you very much for your comment! I like your approach, because I can't find a reason on why the pressure should be bellow a certain limit.
Feb
18
revised Why apply voltage on an Si detector only on atmosphere or high vacuum
added 5 characters in body; edited title
Feb
18
asked Why apply voltage on an Si detector only on atmosphere or high vacuum
Dec
25
comment What are the criteria to have rutherford backscattering?
Although I can see the famous $1/\sin^4{\theta/2}$ formula, there isn't any probability formula on en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rutherford_Scattering_Formula
Nov
30
asked Unknown peaks on RBS spectrum
Nov
30
revised 4 element super conductor without oxygen and iron
added 317 characters in body
Nov
30
revised 4 element super conductor without oxygen and iron
added 309 characters in body
Nov
30
comment 4 element super conductor without oxygen and iron
Thank you very much for your answer! It appears though, that it cannot be iron based;it has to be heavier than iron... Please see my edited question!
Nov
30
comment 4 element super conductor without oxygen and iron
@Lagerbaer: Thank you very much for your comment! I've used your superconductor, but it appears that iron-based are not suitable... It must be a heavier element...
Nov
29
asked 4 element super conductor without oxygen and iron
Nov
29
comment What are the criteria to have rutherford backscattering?
Thank you very much for your answer! I am aware of the fact that the lower the energy, the least likely, backscattering will occur. I am looking for a "formula" that given the beam energy or/and beam's and target's $Z$'s or/and anything relevant, will give the possibility to have such a scattering. I am not sure if such thing exists, however...