1,923 reputation
418
bio website atmos.uw.edu/~akchen0
location Seattle, WA
age 94
visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen Sep 5 at 23:37

Feel free to stalk my Internet name(s) if you wish - it's how I make most of my closest contacts these days. Just note that I don't really believe in social constructs when they get in the way of satisficing (or in the way of my goal of learning as much as possible).

Don't take anything I say/do too seriously. A lot of the things I do (that may look weird/stupid on the outside) are the types of things that help me adjust my posterior probability of various things - especially low probability events.Sometimes I hit on a jackpot/very interesting idea. I'm kind of messy since it helps facilitate creative destruction.

I have a lot of respect for all of the sciences. Tactically, I'm developing heuristics for rationality, impartiality, anti-laziness, and creation+identification+searching for what's relevant+reliable. Strategically, I just want to learn everything.

A lot of my thought processes involve my creating new hypotheses and refuting them on my own. I still document the thought process since it's important and may be important for future "true" hypotheses.


Nov
2
comment If there is significant temperature difference between indoor air and outdoor air, will that significantly increase the rate of air exchange?
Thanks for the answer. :) Yes - I would like to know the rate of air exchange without any air displacement due to pressure difference. Interesting point about the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. :)
Feb
4
comment Why don't any of the gas giants have moons of Earth's mass (or greater) that orbit them? Is this generalizable to exoplanet gas giants?
"I don't think your first paragraph around ice and rock has anything to do with the question on whether gas giants should have Earth-sized moons." I'm thinking that ice and rock accrete differently though. So they would affect whether or not they have Earth-sized moons at distances less than the "ice belt", or where ice would vaporize and not be available. If they didn't vaporize, Earth could even be much larger than it is now (with much more ice)
Oct
4
comment Does the heat death of the universe really imply a maximum entropy state *all* of the time? Or most of the time?
I'd still like some clarification though. Especially since everyone else still seems to believe in the opposite
Sep
21
comment What physical interactions actually make single stars leave their binary companions at formation?
Wow - amazing game!
Sep
21
comment What physical interactions actually make single stars leave their binary companions at formation?
Oh I see - so since it's 3-body, it can't be analytically solved in most cases, right?
Sep
19
comment What physical interactions actually make single stars leave their binary companions at formation?
Hm, well, what physically happens when a star gets pulled out? Is it analogous to the situation where a spaceprobe gets accelerated by Jupiter's gravity?
Sep
17
comment Are there planets that do not rotate on their axis?
Interesting answer. Another thing though: Wouldn't non-rotating objects have to be tidally locked after a certain (really) long period of time? Of course, there could be a brief window of non-rotation
Aug
30
comment Assuming an observer is 50 light years away, in the plane of the solar system and observing earth, what is the light flux of earth he would see?
Okay, question inverted
Aug
30
comment Assuming an observer is 50 light years away, in the plane of the solar system and observing earth, what is the light flux of earth he would see?
Hm - just assume full phase, Earth-size, average Earth albedo, and 50% illumination over the entire visible to IR range
Aug
20
comment What distinguishes a moon from orbiting space debris? Or in other words, when is a satellite “too small” to be a moon?
Oh, good points. Do all of Saturn's inner moons clear the regions around them? (and thus form gaps?)
Aug
18
comment What are some molecules stable in outer space that are unstable under terrestrial conditions?
Well, asking for specific examples is fine? It is a broad question, but we don't even know most of them. Getting a fraction of them is a lot better than nothing.
Aug
18
comment Most accurate ways to find the average distance between stars in Milky way galaxy
Oh, very good points there - thanks! I'll try to add those points in when I have some time
Aug
18
comment For resolving different objects, are there any alternative coefficients to the one used in the Rayleigh criterion? (which is 1.22)
Oh cool. So what if the final goal is the goal you've just mentioned? I'm just interested in cataloging all the final goals.
Aug
18
comment How are galaxy filaments formed? And do they have any analogues in stellar formation?
Wow - so cool! I'll definitely have to read more into this
Aug
17
comment What is the irregularity in Uranus' orbit that is caused by Neptune?
"The net effect is to almost cancel each other out. But you are right, over a very long period of time, it can have an affect. The same is true of all planets, they affect each other over a long period of time" Interesting point. But then what makes Uranus/Neptune different from other planet combinations?
Aug
11
comment Assuming that the Sun wouldn't evolve into a red giant, how long would the Earth's atmosphere last?
Wow - good answer! By acceleration, do you mean that the escape rate would accelerate as more atmosphere is lost?
Aug
10
comment Assuming that the Sun wouldn't evolve into a red giant, how long would the Earth's atmosphere last?
Well - the fact is - all models have non-physical assumptions. It's necessary when we want to study one particular process in detail. Atmospheric science is full of non-physical assumptions (slab-ocean model, aquaplanet, Lovelock's daisies, etc) because we have to get a physical interpretation of the dynamics
Aug
10
comment How can we be sure that liquid iron/titanium droplets can form around particulates on hot Jupiters - just as they do on Earth and Venus?
Wow cool - do you have any links to condensation of other fluids on other particulates?
Jul
29
comment Could asteroseismology have a significant potential to unravel the mechanisms of solar cycles that last thousands of years?
Yeah I know. But we only have data from the Sun at one point of its life.
Jul
29
comment Spinning wheel on rotating stool - why am I also affected even when the wheel axis is horizontal?
How does it happen when the two axes are totally perpendicular to each other though? The axis of angular momentum (on the bottom) can only point up or down (it can increase its up/downness). The axis of angular momentum (on the wheel) only points sideways (you can move it around a bit though)