559 reputation
418
bio website flickr.com/photos/…
location Birmingham, UK
age 25
visits member for 2 years
seen Nov 20 at 23:42

PhD student at the Astrophysics and Space Research group, University of Birmingham, UK. Mainly interested in gravitational waves, quantum optics and laser interferometry.

I hold a spanish Licenciatura degree in Physics (B.Sc. + M.Sc. equivalent) with specialisation in Photonics.


Nov
5
awarded  Yearling
Jul
29
comment Total internal reflection and waveguides
The phase shift below the critical angle is always $\pi$ because the interface is acting as a mirror, i.e. the reflected electric field is the mirror image of the incident electric field. You can regard this as having the real valued $R$ expressed in terms of its magnitude multiplied by $e^{j 2 \pi} = 1$. When the critical angle is surpassed the interface is no longer acting as a mirror, but as something else, and phase shift occurs. I sometimes use j instead of i as the imaginary unit.
Jul
18
revised Total internal reflection and waveguides
edited body
Jul
18
answered Total internal reflection and waveguides
Jul
12
revised Why does a single mode fibre have a cutoff wavelength?
edited body
Jul
12
answered Why does a single mode fibre have a cutoff wavelength?
Jun
8
awarded  Disciplined
Jun
1
answered Optical Waveguides with grating
Dec
20
accepted Orthogonality between $\vec{E}$ and $\vec{H}$ waves with space-dependent amplitudes
Dec
16
accepted Third order optical mixing
Dec
15
asked Third order optical mixing
Nov
28
revised Orthogonality between $\vec{E}$ and $\vec{H}$ waves with space-dependent amplitudes
deleted 306 characters in body
Nov
24
awarded  Revival
Nov
24
revised Is there a simple model explaining Faraday effect?
deleted 1 characters in body
Nov
24
answered Is there a simple model explaining Faraday effect?
Nov
22
comment Orthogonality between $\vec{E}$ and $\vec{H}$ waves with space-dependent amplitudes
@Adam you are totally right, I am talking about a unique source of, say, electric field $\vec E$ with its corresponding $\vec H$ given by Maxwell.
Nov
22
revised Orthogonality between $\vec{E}$ and $\vec{H}$ waves with space-dependent amplitudes
added 11 characters in body; edited title
Nov
22
comment Orthogonality between $\vec{E}$ and $\vec{H}$ waves with space-dependent amplitudes
My regime is indeed monochromatic fields, I thought plane waves could have non-constant amplitudes and still be called plane waves. To be precise I'm considering optical TE or TM modes in a waveguide. $\vec E\left( {\vec r,t} \right) = \vec E\left( {\vec r} \right)\exp \left( { - i\omega t} \right) = E\left( x \right)\hat y\exp \left\{ {i\left( {\beta z - \omega t} \right)} \right\}$
Nov
22
awarded  Commentator
Nov
22
revised Orthogonality between $\vec{E}$ and $\vec{H}$ waves with space-dependent amplitudes
CED tag is relevant