559 reputation
318
bio website flickr.com/photos/…
location Santiago, Spain
age 24
visits member for 1 year, 9 months
seen Aug 20 at 19:34

I just finished a Licenciatura in Physics with specialisation in Photonics and Optoelectronics. (Licenciatura = 5-year-long B.Sc. from Spain, 300 ECTS). I'm looking into my options to further develop my career in this field.

I'm mostly interested in Quantum Optics, Quantum Information, Photonics and General Relativity.


Jul
29
comment Total internal reflection and waveguides
The phase shift below the critical angle is always $\pi$ because the interface is acting as a mirror, i.e. the reflected electric field is the mirror image of the incident electric field. You can regard this as having the real valued $R$ expressed in terms of its magnitude multiplied by $e^{j 2 \pi} = 1$. When the critical angle is surpassed the interface is no longer acting as a mirror, but as something else, and phase shift occurs. I sometimes use j instead of i as the imaginary unit.
Jul
18
revised Total internal reflection and waveguides
edited body
Jul
18
answered Total internal reflection and waveguides
Jul
12
revised Why does a single mode fibre have a cutoff wavelength?
edited body
Jul
12
answered Why does a single mode fibre have a cutoff wavelength?
Jun
8
awarded  Disciplined
Jun
1
answered Optical Waveguides with grating
Dec
20
accepted Orthogonality between $\vec{E}$ and $\vec{H}$ waves with space-dependent amplitudes
Dec
16
accepted Third order optical mixing
Dec
15
asked Third order optical mixing
Nov
28
revised Orthogonality between $\vec{E}$ and $\vec{H}$ waves with space-dependent amplitudes
deleted 306 characters in body
Nov
24
awarded  Revival
Nov
24
revised Is there a simple model explaining Faraday effect?
deleted 1 characters in body
Nov
24
answered Is there a simple model explaining Faraday effect?
Nov
22
comment Orthogonality between $\vec{E}$ and $\vec{H}$ waves with space-dependent amplitudes
@Adam you are totally right, I am talking about a unique source of, say, electric field $\vec E$ with its corresponding $\vec H$ given by Maxwell.
Nov
22
revised Orthogonality between $\vec{E}$ and $\vec{H}$ waves with space-dependent amplitudes
added 11 characters in body; edited title
Nov
22
comment Orthogonality between $\vec{E}$ and $\vec{H}$ waves with space-dependent amplitudes
My regime is indeed monochromatic fields, I thought plane waves could have non-constant amplitudes and still be called plane waves. To be precise I'm considering optical TE or TM modes in a waveguide. $\vec E\left( {\vec r,t} \right) = \vec E\left( {\vec r} \right)\exp \left( { - i\omega t} \right) = E\left( x \right)\hat y\exp \left\{ {i\left( {\beta z - \omega t} \right)} \right\}$
Nov
22
awarded  Commentator
Nov
22
revised Orthogonality between $\vec{E}$ and $\vec{H}$ waves with space-dependent amplitudes
CED tag is relevant
Nov
22
comment Orthogonality between $\vec{E}$ and $\vec{H}$ waves with space-dependent amplitudes
Yes, the problem is really with showing orthogonality between $\vec{H}$ and $\vec{E}$. If you happen to come across a proof for this, I'd really appreciate it if you report back!