Reputation
263
Next privilege 500 Rep.
Access review queues
Badges
2 10 27
Impact
~72k people reached

  • 0 posts edited
  • 0 helpful flags
  • 65 votes cast
Aug
15
comment Determining the Wave Function From Initial Conditions
Yes, exactly. As far as I understand, the most general solution of the infinite well is $\Psi (x,t) = \sum_{n=1}^{\infty} c_n \psi_n(x) \phi_n(t)$, where the coefficients are $c_n = \sqrt{\frac{2}{a}} \int_{0}^{a} \sin(\frac{n \pi}{a} x) \Psi(x,t)$. Why wouldn't I use these two equations to calculate the wavefunction for all future times?
Aug
15
asked Determining the Wave Function From Initial Conditions
Jul
29
accepted Finding Interatomic Spacing
Jul
28
asked Finding Interatomic Spacing
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
May
13
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
19
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
26
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
17
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
7
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
2
comment Collision Between Two Particles: Writing the Mass As A Function of The Angle
I don't believe this is a duplicate: I am asking for advice as to how I might write $\displaystyle \frac{m_1}{m_2}$ as a function of the angle (some angle); but the other question asks to verify unrelated equations.
Jan
2
comment Collision Between Two Particles: Writing the Mass As A Function of The Angle
Well, I was defining $\theta$ as the angle between the final velocity vectors. Would this not be helpful?
Dec
31
asked Collision Between Two Particles: Writing the Mass As A Function of The Angle
Nov
27
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
3
awarded  Yearling
Oct
13
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
2
awarded  Notable Question
Sep
5
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
25
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
23
awarded  Popular Question