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15m
comment How does one detect a single photon?
@MartyGreen No. I could not check whether it was a real experiment or not and preferred to give a link to an obviously real experiment. It may be valid as far as I could check.
18m
comment Same photon or different photon?
I am describing a quantum mechanical scattering. Note the crucial word "probability". The probability is high that the photon will scatter in the direction that will keep the macroscopic "sameness". I have given a link on how the photons build up light. My answer depends on the way I defined "same".
6h
comment Can bending spacetime produce electromagnetic fields?
@JohnDuffield I am a particle physicist and believe that eventually the graviton will be part of the standard particle table, no longer a guess. In the quantum regime there exists an electron graviton scattering which will have as a possible final state the production of photons. analogous to the Ze channel here:cds.cern.ch/record/289120/files/9510024.pdf?version=1 . where gamma is in the place of Z
6h
comment How does one detect a single photon?
@MartyGreen changed video
20h
comment Can bending spacetime produce electromagnetic fields?
@JohnDuffield this gives a window for observing falling charges into strong gravitational fields arxiv.org/pdf/1301.1559.pdf . "A general method has been developed to find radiated electromagnetic multipole fields for the free falling multipoles into a black hole (including higher order mul- tipoles quadrupoles, etc.). The electromagnetic spectrum can be compared with observational data from stellar mass and smaller black holes."
20h
comment Can bending spacetime produce electromagnetic fields?
@JohnDuffield found this arxiv.org/pdf/1509.08757.pdf " It seems a controversial issue, which he solves by a different interpretation. Anyway, since it seems to be an open question , I am with the ones who say it radiates.
21h
comment Can bending spacetime produce electromagnetic fields?
@JohnDuffield changing electric fields do tapir.caltech.edu/~teviet/Waves/empulse.html . google.gr/… it will be a very very low frequency physics.stackexchange.com/questions/70915/… though
2d
comment Why is there no current flow when i connect two opposite terminals of two separate batteries
@justin I still do not understand the question . The diagram says it all. Better find a chemistry question and answer site. I do not know enough chemistry to answer further
2d
comment How to draw Feynman diagram for K^- + p -> Sigma^0 + pi^0 — superposition in diagram
The quarkline is interpreted as a particle going forward in time and an antiparticle going backward .in example 12, the reason it goes backwards is the gluon exchanged that balances the four vectors of the interacting quarks
2d
comment How to draw Feynman diagram for K^- + p -> Sigma^0 + pi^0 — superposition in diagram
You have to conserve all the quantum numbers and charges and use the decay forms of the quarks hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/particles/qrkdec.html#c2 . you would not get a K0 if you used the up, but again a K=, a different channel. the charge would come out wrong.
2d
comment How to draw Feynman diagram for K^- + p -> Sigma^0 + pi^0 — superposition in diagram
How pi0 is treated here teachers.web.cern.ch/teachers/archiv/HST2002/feynman/…
2d
comment How to draw Feynman diagram for K^- + p -> Sigma^0 + pi^0 — superposition in diagram
The Feynman diagram site of CERN may help, here is a K+p diagram to K0 delta++ teachers.web.cern.ch/teachers/archiv/HST2002/feynman/… the list at teachers.web.cern.ch/teachers/archiv/HST2002/feynman/… . You do not have to have both sets for the pi0 because the vertex with the strange quark should guide which of the two it is.
2d
comment Why is there no current flow when i connect two opposite terminals of two separate batteries
@justin I do not understand you question. The whole point of an electrolyte that can deposit on coppe and dissolve from zink is the carrying of charge as seen in the diagram. This cannot happen with water. Bye Bye
May
2
comment Why is there no current flow when i connect two opposite terminals of two separate batteries
@justin I am sorry, no, although I can guess since copper containers were popular before stainless steel that not much copper is dissolved in water.
May
1
comment Why build so big sarcophagus in Chernobyl instead another alternative?
according to this en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chernobyl_New_Safe_Confinement the old sarcophagus is unstable, the whole thing is still highly radioactive and has to be contained in order not to spread to the environment . The goals: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… include eventual demolition.
May
1
comment What do the batteries actually do to the electrons?
I think it is a descriptive point of what the mathematics would be if one wanted to model the effect.
May
1
comment What do the batteries actually do to the electrons?
have a look at hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/electric/miccur.html
May
1
comment Mathematical treatment of electron double slit experiment
Have you derived the above equation from Maxwells equations simply? equivalently there will be a derivation but I do not know if somebody has gone to the trouble since it needs QED, not Schrodinger. Since the de Broglie relation has been verified everybody uses the optics equations. Possibly designers of electron microscopes may have gone the full road.
May
1
comment Mathematical treatment of electron double slit experiment
You have to use the wavefunction for the set up "electron scattering off a single slit", not the wavefunction of the free electron. On an individual electron scatter the fields of the molecules on the side of the slits provide the scattering target and the boundary conditions. "transmission function" is a shorthand of this and the equivalent to the optics exists for electrons also. sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/036820489185032O
May
1
comment Mathematical treatment of electron double slit experiment
It is the same as with photons taking the wavelength from the de Broglie relationship. single slit electron does have a diffraction . why do you say it does not? aeroja.blogspot.gr/2011/02/… for a calculation guide