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Apr
23
revised Don't all waves transport mass?
added link and paragraph related to statement from comments
Apr
23
comment How does Zumberge's 1981 gravitational measurements relate to gravitational waves?
@Mike the link you give in the comments to my answer is important. In the conclusion it says: "The differential part of the tidal deformation resembles a gravitational-wave signal and must be removed by actuating the mirrors ". Maybe you should incorporate it in your answer.
Apr
23
comment How does Zumberge's 1981 gravitational measurements relate to gravitational waves?
@Sandgroper Look at the conclusions in the link by Mike "The differential part of the tidal deformation resembles a gravitational-wave signal and must be removed by actuating the mirrors" . Tides are predictable with mathematical functions dependent on the orbits of the planets and star of our system. They have removed the effect of tides.
Apr
23
comment How does Zumberge's 1981 gravitational measurements relate to gravitational waves?
@PeterR Yes, I state it as a hypothesis in the beginning of my answer. " accepting that the effective quantization used in cosmological problems is at work."
Apr
22
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
22
comment Does the field of a unifirmly moving charge satisfy Maxwell's wave equation?
have a look at Motl's answer here physics.stackexchange.com/q/3580 . I do not agree that ""any function that "moves" should satisfy its own "wave equation"" . where did you see this? . A uniformly moving charge does not radiate. depending on the inertial frame of observation the shape of the field will be distorted according to the motion (not 1/r^2 for the stationary observer)
Apr
22
comment How did gravity exist before mass?
The einstein equations. The connect mass and energy through the stress energy tenson
Apr
22
comment Hawking Radiation and Curvature
Yes, I think it should be a separate question, more people may answer. You should make it clearer. Why are you separating detectors from observers? The detectors are observers in my books
Apr
22
comment How does Zumberge's 1981 gravitational measurements relate to gravitational waves?
to continue on this line: put an AC accross a capacitor. Will it make a good antenna radiating an EM wave? No , a very small part of the power may be radiated as em wav, but the changing electric field is just a changing electric field, i.e. a varying potential difference, with the frequency of the AC but no wave. In similar fashion, and much worse because the gravitational constant is so tiny, the asymmetrically changing mass distributions will radiate a tiny amount of gravitational waves away, but most of the power is in the gravitational field which is varying a potential difference.
Apr
22
comment How does Zumberge's 1981 gravitational measurements relate to gravitational waves?
No, it is not. Both measure gravitational effects, but gravitational waves have on mass shell gravitons, i.e. elementary particles, the way electromagnetic waves have on mass shell photons. For example, it is the em waves that generate the photoelectric effect, not the electric field of a capacitor no matter how much it changes, because the photons between the plates of a capacitor are not on mass shell, not real .
Apr
22
comment What's the origin of electrical resistance?
hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/solids/band.html also hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/electric/conins.html#c1 and hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/electric/ohmmic.html#c1 and links therein
Apr
22
comment Create a laser from sun light
@DirkBruere why don't you use the links in the comments for your answer. comments have a way of disappearing here.
Apr
22
comment Is the motion of a particle non-analytic?
it is the instantaneous force, which is dp/dt. Why is there a problem? the "suddenly" means a impulse en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impulse_%28physics%29 . all these are ok in classical mechanics problems
Apr
22
answered If I charge a battery using a much higher current, can it explode?
Apr
22
answered Why should mass be attractive in nature?
Apr
22
comment What really is the smallest “mass” or “object” in the universe?
"why does smaller have limits" is not answerable by physics theories, and can only be bounded by observations/experiment. Physics does not answer "why"questions, only "how" , using mathematical models, causal connections of observations are best described .
Apr
22
revised What really is the smallest “mass” or “object” in the universe?
qualified "mass growing" guessing from context
Apr
22
comment How does the uncertainty principle relate to quantum fluctuations?
@whatwhatwhat One can write down integrals for a loop diagram with only virtual particles, but it is just mathematics because the particles are off mass shell, and the integral is over the available phase space and even this off mass shell changes under the integral. Only when some real outgoing or incoming line exists will there be a physically observable effect. An off shell line from a field at the horizon to the loop can provide enough energy for one of the particles to escape and the other to fall in, depleting the energy of the black hole.
Apr
22
comment Can electrons escape a black hole?
have a look at my answer here physics.stackexchange.com/questions/250543/…
Apr
22
comment How does the uncertainty principle relate to quantum fluctuations?
@whatwhatwhat interactions. The horizon is full with real particles falling in. These cause interactions between particles and with the fields in the horizon. From these, at the horizon, some loops may get enough energy for one of the components to become real and escape and the other to disappear into the horizon.