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age 74
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Retired experimental particle physicist.

The picture is a fayum . It looks like aunts and cousins of mine :).


Oct
8
comment What happens when Antimatter interacts with a photon?
this experiment hopes to measure g for antihydrogen aegis.web.cern.ch/aegis/research.html
Oct
8
comment Does electron being many places at the same time violate Physics laws?
I disagree with your interpretation of the two slit single electron. The quantum mechanical solution of "two slits and electron passing" gives a probability for the electron to pass through one or the other slit and that probability has a wave structure that is why we see it even one by one.
Oct
8
answered Does electron being many places at the same time violate Physics laws?
Oct
8
comment Does electron being many places at the same time violate Physics laws?
I read the chat and I will write another answer to this question as the comments are too long anyway
Oct
7
comment Does electron being many places at the same time violate Physics laws?
I am saying that in many experimental measurements the errors are larger than the uncertainty principle, and when we reach the level where it is important, as in nanotechnology, the HUP is incorporated in the probability distribution. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…
Oct
7
comment Does electron being many places at the same time violate Physics laws?
@DanielSank note my addition to the comment. true some experiments display the hup
Oct
7
comment Does electron being many places at the same time violate Physics laws?
No, because the errors in our instruments are way larger than the bounds of the heisenberg uncertainty principle.In addition, the probability distribution is an expression of the heisenberg uncertainty
Oct
7
comment Does electron being many places at the same time violate Physics laws?
If we have the proper instruments we can look at an (x,y,z,t). The electron has a probability of registering in our detector,which means for a particular measurement either we will find it there or not (zero). If we repeat the experiment many times we will get the probability of finding it there (whole), and it will be in accordance with the probability calculated from the square of the wavefunction that describes the system under consideration.
Oct
7
comment Does electron being many places at the same time violate Physics laws?
Yes, fluffy bunny talk
Oct
7
comment Does electron being many places at the same time violate Physics laws?
This is wrong: "represents the electron being many places at the same time". It is a probability cloud, a locus where it is probable to find the electron if one measures it. Outside that locus the probability is essentially zero. Suppose I know you have entered a building. I could draw a probability locus in the shape of the building (giving higher probability to toilets or information desks). This does not mean that you are spread all over the building.
Oct
7
comment Did the Big Bang happen at a point?
@MBN I think my answer says that most probably it happened at a fuzzy point, as shown in the picture. But we have to keep an open mind because we really have no definitive theory on what happens at the projected classical singular point of the Big Bang general relativity equations. We know quantum must take over, and thus the fuzziness.This does not disagree with John's "everywhere in the universe at the same time" since the fuzzy point is the total universe at that time.
Oct
7
answered How can water be liquid and gas in the same environment?
Oct
6
comment Can a human be killed by electro-static discharge while performing daily chores?
what you describe is way out of what power a spark from triboelectric effect can deliver,unless you are wearing unusual clothing, Of course there exist triboelectric generators.
Oct
6
revised How do we know that nuclear physics corresponds to low energy QCD?
added 384 characters in body
Oct
6
answered How do we know that nuclear physics corresponds to low energy QCD?
Oct
6
answered Can a human be killed by electro-static discharge while performing daily chores?
Oct
6
comment Why do electrons in an atom occupy only the stationary states?
@garyp In my books, to every observable there corresponds an operator. If the function you are talking about is not an energy eigenvalue it will not be possible to check it experimentally by measurement. Possibly, like virtual particles in QFT it is a useful construct, but , in my opinion, not within the context of this question which is talking of energy eigenfunctions and occupation of shells.
Oct
5
revised Did the Big Bang happen at a point?
corrected "expansion of spacetime" to " expansion of space
Oct
5
comment Why do electrons in an atom occupy only the stationary states?
@ACuriousMind I included it with an edit
Oct
5
revised Why do electrons in an atom occupy only the stationary states?
added 659 characters in body