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348179
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location Greece
age 75
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Retired experimental particle physicist.

The picture is a fayum . It looks like aunts and cousins of mine :).


Aug
27
answered Entropy reversal in magnets
Aug
27
answered Is it physics that leads to development of maths or is it maths that leads to the development of physics?
Aug
27
comment Why the Yang-Mills ansatz is able to describe every interaction we know?
Probably Newton was thinking "how can I devise a general mathematical model that will come out with the Kepler orbits".
Aug
27
comment Why the Yang-Mills ansatz is able to describe every interaction we know?
Physics does not answer basic why questions. It describes how with certain assumptions a mathematical model from the axioms and postulates ( the correspondence of physics to mathematics "axioms" ) describes data and predicts the behavior of new data. The link can be followed up to the postulates. On the way, one can say |"I see why", but ultimately the how stops at the postulates. I suspect an explicit or implicit postulate in the theoretical models is responsible for this universality you observe. I expect probably something to do with the structure of spaces (all types of).
Aug
27
answered Can an atoms energy levels be changed by changing the de Broglie wavelength of electrons?
Aug
27
revised In quantum mechanics, given certain energy spectrum can one generate the corresponding potential?
expanded the answer
Aug
27
answered In quantum mechanics, given certain energy spectrum can one generate the corresponding potential?
Aug
26
comment Can we reconstruct 1D potentials in QM from the spectrum?
@yuggib They were looking for a mathematical model that would explain/have_as_solution the Balmer series rigorously,without the assumptions of the Bohr model. in my view this is reverse.
Aug
26
comment Can we reconstruct 1D potentials in QM from the spectrum?
@yuggib that is mathematics predicting about all data. I am pointing out that data led to the initial mathematics vindication of the QM model with the hydrogen atom. Your "no" is qualified by the existence of this opposite way. So it may not be a mathematical theorem, but the possibility existed, fortunately for physics.
Aug
26
comment Do neutrons in an atomic nucleus exert strong force on each other?
please see this answer here, it makes the role of protons clear physics.stackexchange.com/questions/9098/…
Aug
26
comment How do we see? Where do the photons disappear?
@RussellMcMahon You are wrong. There exists an enormous amount of experimental data that agrees with the limit of velocity being c, including the currently running LHC experiments. We are long past the age when one could ruminate and come up with the atomic theory. We have hard numbers now.
Aug
26
comment Can we reconstruct 1D potentials in QM from the spectrum?
I would tend to say "yes" because the Shrodinger equation managed to get the Balmer series which was an experimental observation first. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… . At least it precludes a "no"
Aug
26
comment How do we see? Where do the photons disappear?
@RussellMcMahon Not in my books. there is nothing exceeding the velocity of light c after all –
Aug
26
awarded  Good Answer
Aug
26
comment Estimation of the age of Earth
You should give a link because this estimate is within a model of how planets are created
Aug
26
revised If heat can't be transformed into other forms of entropy, why do hot things radiate electromagnetic waves?
added 351 characters in body
Aug
26
answered If heat can't be transformed into other forms of entropy, why do hot things radiate electromagnetic waves?
Aug
26
awarded  optics
Aug
25
awarded  Enlightened
Aug
25
comment How do we see? Where do the photons disappear?
@JDługosz If photons were stored and released, the mass of the electron would change get smaller or larger. But probably the answerer does not believe in special relativity either. This answer is complete fabrication