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3h
revised Do quark charges repel one another?
correction after comment
3h
revised Do quark charges repel one another?
correction after comment
3h
comment Do quark charges repel one another?
represents does not mean equal, I used it in the sense that it corresponds to the force, in general forces correspond to potentials .for a conservative force dV/dx=F(x) hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/pegrav.html I will edit for clarity
7h
comment Do quark charges repel one another?
@BillAlsept the proton/neutron as the case may be
7h
comment Do quark charges repel one another?
As one can deduce from the distributions, there is an interplay, the charge distribution is not uniform . A specific mathematical model has to be used which has to include both forces, strong and electromagnetic. example Lattice QCD nersc.gov/assets/HPC-Requirements-for-Science/NP2017/…
9h
revised Do quark charges repel one another?
added 1647 characters in body
11h
answered Do quark charges repel one another?
12h
answered Are there any practical applications of the uncertainty principle
16h
comment Why should I believe that “elementary” particles are indeed elementary?
electrons to appear in our measurements as point particles, will need much higher energy experiments than provided even at LHC. Maybe the linear collider, if built, might show structure in electrons and positrons. Or maybe 50 years hence. The theory is not forgotten, it is just not worked on much because it is an alternative that cannot be checked by data.
17h
comment Why should I believe that “elementary” particles are indeed elementary?
@descheleschilder as one can see here people are still trying to define the necessary conditions so that a rishon based model can explain the data ( about page 13), uwaterloo.ca/phys13news/sites/ca.phys13news/files/uploads/files/… . At the moment mainstream theory moves towards quantization of gravity and unification of forces. Rishons and derivative theories are at the stage that the quark model was in 1964 . Quarks were confirmed as experimental entities by their jets in the 1980s. The rishons, due to the much higher binding energies needed for
18h
answered Conservation of $C$-Parity and $P$-parity
18h
comment Why is an electron negatively charged, and what is the difference between negative and positive charges?
WHY questions in physics on fundamental definitions end up on the postulates and laws which have to be assumed so that a mathematical model fits existing data and predicts new observations. The postulates and laws have been chosen for the mathematical model as extra axioms BECAUSE they constrain the mathematics to observations and correct predictions. One of the implicit postulates from data is the existence of two opposite charges, and the sign is an arbitrary convention.
18h
comment Why is an electron negatively charged, and what is the difference between negative and positive charges?
@Shookster The theory of general relativity is an exception in its appearance, as it appeared long before there were any data to confirm its predictions. WHY questions in physics on fundamental definitions end up on the postulates and laws which have to be assumed so that a mathematical model fits existing data and predicts new observations. The postulates and laws have been chosen for the mathematical model as extra axioms BECAUSE they constrain the mathematics to observations and correct predictions. One of the implicit postulates from data is the existence of two opposite charges.
18h
comment At what point is a particle too small to cause a nuclear reaction?
@Jen elementary particles have zero size and with enough energy they split the nucleus. Protons and neutrons are quark composites and have sizes, with enough energy they split the nucleus. Nuclear fragments with enough energy they split the nucleus. Size is irrelevant, it the the crossection of interactions which depends on energy . read up the link.
1d
comment Why does Special Relativity apply to more than just light?
It was the brilliant contribution of Einstein to apply the Lorenz transformations that had been derived for electromagnetic waves (hence the name Lorenz) to particles also. It was a hypothesis that has been proven correct experimentally innumerable times. It is now and axiom in all modern physics theoretical models. So the answer to the "why" is "because" this is the way nature works.
1d
comment What is the smallest item for which gravity has been recorded or observed?
arxiv.org/pdf/1602.07539.pdf a 2016 proposal for milligram sources of gravity
1d
comment Does gravity exist between quarks in a neutron?
@MSha Why dont you make it an answer?
1d
awarded  Nice Answer
1d
comment The mass of the proton times its charge radius is very close to 4ħ/c. Is this a coincidence?
@dandb it is unfair to think that theorists are not working on the mass of the proton from basics arxiv.org/abs/0906.0126 . It is just hard and challenging
1d
comment Does absolute motion exist?
"Now if we had put a (massless) accelerometer on one of the chunks with zero momentum and saw it recorded a flat line still was in absolute rest" Wrong. It could have an arbitrary in value uniform velocity with respect to any arbitrary system. The only thing one could deduce is that no dv/dt happened to it in any system.