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Physics Stack Exchange users whose comments are worth studying include Lubos Motl and Ron Maimon (now at http://www.quora.com/Ron-Maimon and http://www.physicsoverflow.org/user/Ron+Maimon). Also see http://arxiv.org/abs/hep-ph/0207124 for a review of physics since the standard model.


Nov
2
comment Black-hole firewall and holographic principle
It might be best if we created a room on chat.physics.SE or otherwise had a dialogue about these topics.
Nov
2
comment Black-hole firewall and holographic principle
But I also liked Mathur's fuzzball concept, which could imply that the black hole is generically an extended object reaching out to the horizon - that even with a giant black hole, the event horizon isn't just homogeneous empty space on either side...
Nov
2
comment Black-hole firewall and holographic principle
However, I am somewhat skeptical of this picture (original BHC), and very skeptical of firewalls. The recent papers by Papadodimas and Raju look more plausible to me - no firewall, the AMPS paradox is avoided by a nuance of how the boundary theory describes the black hole interior...
Nov
2
comment Black-hole firewall and holographic principle
If such a picture were true, rather than being an addendum to holographic duality on the boundary, I think it would be just a possible redescription of the "bulk" theory. That is, you wouldn't have a new boundary theory which was defined on "rectangle+circle" (edge of space but event horizon)...
Nov
2
comment Black-hole firewall and holographic principle
Hmm. I believe the original idea of black hole complementarity was that everything behind the event horizon is dual to degrees of freedom which pile up just outside the horizon, and then get re-radiated. So in the second picture, the Hawking radiation doesn't come from the other side...
Nov
1
comment The Higgs vacuum
There are aspects of QFT practice (the way physicists use it) which have never found mathematically rigorous formulation, I wonder if this is another example?
Nov
1
answered Have we found a Higgsino?
Nov
1
answered Black-hole firewall and holographic principle
Oct
31
comment Black-hole firewall and holographic principle
I disagree that someone could answer this question just by studying what experts say about firewalls. It requires some understanding of the holographic principle, maybe the membrane paradigm for black hole event horizons, and other concepts. I will answer if I can think of a reasonable thing to say.
Oct
28
comment A gentle introduction to CFT
The questions are being answered here: physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=719388
Oct
28
comment A gentle introduction to CFT
This particular list-of-questions is actually a good one - they are not unreasonable, they go together, they are aspects of the theme (CFTs) which an answer providing a general introduction to that subject might cover anyway.
Oct
3
comment How to determine the amount of light energy (photons) being released from an incandescent light bulb?
Well, it was either this, or just say, "there is no effect, the quarks aren't involved in the emission of light". As I tried to convey with the fly taking off from the balloon containing the marbles, there will be some indirect reaction back on the nucleus, as part of the recoil from emitting the photon, but it will be minuscule.
Oct
2
comment How does the Super-Kamiokande experiment falsify SU(5)?
Some comments on your points 1-4. 1. The simplest way to break the SU(5) symmetry is with a second Higgs field, in addition to the one which subsequently breaks SU(2)xU(1) to U(1). 2. Yes. 3. Quarks and leptons would still be fundamental, but they are classified into larger and fewer multiplets (5- and 10-dimensional reps of SU(5)) than in the SM. 4. The new ingredient is that a quark can become a lepton (or vice versa), thanks to the extra SU(5) bosons (X and Y particles, or leptoquark bosons). It's rare because they are heavy. The proton disintegrates e.g. into a pion and a lepton.
Sep
30
comment Way to become a physicist
You might do better on Quora with this question, because there are so many Indian users there.
Sep
30
comment What happens to the amplituhedron in a non-peturbative context?
@Vibert Perhaps it would be the scattering of the tensionless strings? But both N=4 SYM, and ABJM, have Grassmannian descriptions, so it makes sense that (2,0) would, too.
Sep
27
comment What happens to the amplituhedron in a non-peturbative context?
You can define twistor space for six space-time dimensions e.g. arxiv.org/abs/1111.2539, and there are many connections between 4d, 5d, and 6d SUSY QFTs, e.g. see Witten's work on Khovanov homology. So point taken, but there's reason to believe it's possible.
Sep
25
comment What happens to the amplituhedron in a non-peturbative context?
But that's the theory of scattering inside an M5-brane - how the excitations of the M5-brane interact. Scattering of M5-branes from each other, in some more general space-time background, is a different story, and ties into the general problem of how to understand string theory in the most general way possible.
Sep
25
comment What happens to the amplituhedron in a non-peturbative context?
Regarding the M5-branes... It seems plausible that the worldvolume theory of a stack of M5-branes - which will be some version of (2,0) theory - has an amplituhedron, simply because (2,0) is another conformal, maximal-susy theory.
Sep
25
answered How to determine the amount of light energy (photons) being released from an incandescent light bulb?
Sep
25
comment How to determine the amount of light energy (photons) being released from an incandescent light bulb?
But in a solid... I'm guessing most of the recoil energy will be carried away by conduction electrons somehow. And I'm quite unclear on how to conceive of the mechanical coupling between (nuclei+electron shells) and the Fermi gas of conduction electrons.