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Jan
26
comment Why is the “expansion postulate” a postulate of quantum mechanics?
I never heard of this didactic strategy before. It seems to be a way of declaring "we won't be looking at cases where this isn't true". physics.stackexchange.com/questions/68822/…
Jan
26
comment What does $L^2(S^1,\mu_H)$ mean?
$S^1$ is a circle, a "1-sphere". So this is the space of square-integrable functions over a periodic variable.
Jan
25
answered Super massive Black Hole and photon reduction
Jan
24
comment Beyond usual quantum mechanic description of entanglement, is there any QFT or stringy formalism/explanation of it?
This is a common topic in gauge/gravity duality, e.g. see MERA, Ryu-Takayanagi. Also see "ER=EPR". i.e. don't close this question.
Jan
21
comment What effects would a finding of Gravitational Repulsion Between Matter and Anti-Matter in the ALPHA Experiment have on Mainstream Theory?
Related question: physics.stackexchange.com/questions/83378/…
Jan
21
answered What effects would a finding of Gravitational Repulsion Between Matter and Anti-Matter in the ALPHA Experiment have on Mainstream Theory?
Jan
21
awarded  Yearling
Jan
13
answered Is it possible to create a quark-gluonic reactor to produce energy with help of strong interaction?
Jan
13
comment Holding an electron
@user10379 in order to localize the electron (squeeze the box), some forces must keep knocking the electron back into the box. That is where the velocity uncertainty will increase, to complement the decrease in position uncertainty
Jan
11
answered Why doesn't gravity mess up the double slit experiment?
Jan
11
comment Why doesn't gravity mess up the double slit experiment?
@Conifold possibly arxiv.org/abs/gr-qc/0311082 is all you would need. But as you say, the charge of the electron will affect its environment much much more than its mass. Anyway, the real answer to this question would involve density matrices, and interactions that aren't macroscopically amplified.
Jan
11
comment Does quantum mechanics play a role in the brain?
@Ross Millikan - Penrose's idea was that there is some threshold of difference in the metrics, beyond which a superposition of space-time geometries is not well-defined, and that that is when "wavefunction collapse" occurs. And the threshold is supposed to be quite subtle, so that it can come into play on mesoscopic scales.
Jan
6
comment SU(2) confinement picture
arxiv.org/abs/hep-ph/0206251 is similar
Jan
3
comment Reason for not using Higgs mechanism to solve mass gap problem
Confinement for quarks would explain a lot about mesons and baryons, but isn't proven. Proving confinement for gluons is a first step and would be implied by a mass gap for the gluon field.
Jan
3
comment Reason for not using Higgs mechanism to solve mass gap problem
Physically, the motivating question was "why are nuclear forces short-ranged". For the weak force, the answer is "because the gauge bosons are massive", and the mechanism is Higgs. For the strong force, the answer is believed to be, "because color charge is confined", so it's not that the individual gluons are massive, but rather that they cannot travel freely beyond the confinement distance.
Jan
3
answered Reason for not using Higgs mechanism to solve mass gap problem
Dec
31
comment does my gravity theory sound logical?
In places this reminds me of certain holographic theories. I might write a longer comment
Dec
30
comment What is electron?
plato.stanford.edu/entries/quantum-field-theory/#Wigner physics.stackexchange.com/questions/191010/…
Dec
19
comment Is dark matter (if any) the reason why we even exist?
Maybe it could do with some extra motivation, i.e. @user6760 could say what inspired the question.
Dec
19
comment Is dark matter (if any) the reason why we even exist?
I don't understand in what sense this question is "unclear". It's a simple question. The answer is yes, no, it depends, or we don't know.