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I used to check every question here but not any more. Physics Overflow, which was built from the archives of a defunct "Theoretical Physics Stack Exchange", seems more promising as a place for advanced physics Q&A.


Dec
10
comment How does a Wavefunction collapse?
This question has now been closed, and an annotation added saying that it was already answered elsewhere. But the link elsewhere is to a technical question on how to represent the inexactness of real measurements in the quantum framework, ...
Dec
10
comment How does a Wavefunction collapse?
I'll add that using wavefunctions which evolve with time isn't even the only way to get the predictions of quantum mechanics. The methods of Heisenberg (operator algebra) and of Feynman (path integral) work differently or in a different order, compared to this Schrodinger picture, and for all we know might be more fundamental.
Dec
10
answered How does a Wavefunction collapse?
Dec
4
comment Can String Theory ever be proven?
If string theory could explain the masses of the particles and correctly predict the next decimal place, that would be rather convincing. But for now it mostly contains qualitative ideas about where the symmetries and transformation properties of the known particles come from.
Nov
10
comment Is everything made of space?
"unpublished personal theory"... The idea that everything is just made of space is part of physics history (e.g. the study of "geons"), and you could argue that supergravity as a theory of everything was just a slight generalization of this idea - geometry plus supersymmetry.
Nov
5
answered How can the mass of Higgs give preference to SUSY vs multiverse?
Oct
19
comment Philosophical Interpretation of String Theory
What happened to the bounty on this question? It still had days to run.
Oct
17
comment Is it possible to make superpartner of Standard Model live in Mirror World?
My own idea was physics.stackexchange.com/questions/27421/… ... which could be analyzed using modification of Polonsky's framework perhaps.
Oct
17
comment Is it possible to make superpartner of Standard Model live in Mirror World?
There is some recent work on the possibility that N=2 superpartners of gauge bosons could be detectable motls.blogspot.com/2011/11/could-nature-lhc-prefer-n2.html ... also see arxiv.org/abs/1403.5951
Oct
17
comment Is it possible to make superpartner of Standard Model live in Mirror World?
Most phenomenologists would say that N=2 susy is ruled out because so-called en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oblique_correction to SM prediction (see the paper I linked in my answer) is not observed.
Oct
17
comment Is it possible to make superpartner of Standard Model live in Mirror World?
For references: physicsforums.com/threads/…
Oct
14
comment Is it possible to make superpartner of Standard Model live in Mirror World?
Both models have mirror particles but the details are different, e.g. Polonsky has susy and Berezhiani doesn't; and, in Berezhiani the visible sector and the mirror sector only interact via gravitation, whereas Polonsky has a general framework allowing for a variety of inter-sector interactions.
Oct
14
comment Is it possible to make superpartner of Standard Model live in Mirror World?
btw mirror symmetry here refers to a kind of parity symmetry, and not en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mirror_symmetry_%28string_theory%29 which is far more elaborate.
Oct
14
answered Is it possible to make superpartner of Standard Model live in Mirror World?
Oct
14
comment Is it possible to make superpartner of Standard Model live in Mirror World?
This is a refinement of the question physics.stackexchange.com/questions/141072/… ... if one is to be closed as a duplicate, it might be better to close the old one, since this new version makes the intent of the question clearer.
Sep
24
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Sep
16
comment Was Max Born the first to notice a connection between quantum mechanics and randomness?
@CuriousOne - orthodox QM for more than 80 years has been, the wavefunction evolves deterministically according to Schrodinger's equation, until an observation is made, at which point the wavefunction jumps RANDOMLY to some eigenstate of the observable, with a probability equal to ... blah blah, I'm sure you know this.
Sep
16
comment Was Max Born the first to notice a connection between quantum mechanics and randomness?
@CuriousOne: Suppose I'm going to measure some observable and I start with a superposition of eigenstates, |x>+|y>. According to QM, the system can start in the state |x>+|y>, and then end up in the state |x> or the state |y>. If it was completely deterministic, there would only be one possible end state.
Sep
16
comment Was Max Born the first to notice a connection between quantum mechanics and randomness?
@CuriousOne: you write "[quantum systems] are perfectly causal...", but then "the outcome of an individual measurement... is not fully determined". The last part is where randomness enters, according to quantum theory.
Sep
12
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