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Aug
1
comment Can one stimulate emission of a photon with an energy different from the emitted photon?
I've thought about this for a while and think I've answered my own question. It is basically right what I wrote, just that a) while the emission is stimulated in some sense, it's not what is technically referred to as stimulated emission and b) one can't make net gain with this because the probability is tiny since the ground level is already occupied. I'm willing to mark your answer as right if you correct your second answer, it doesn't make sense. Yes, the photon can decay to E_0, even though it is (in the configuration I laid out) unlikely to do so.
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
18
comment Can one stimulate emission of a photon with an energy different from the emitted photon?
PS: And yes, of course that's "normal behavior". Stimulated emission is also "normal behavior" if you ask me, after all you can derive it.
Jun
18
comment Can one stimulate emission of a photon with an energy different from the emitted photon?
Regarding your question "Can you point to what I wrote that you take to mean "an electron that got there by absorbing an E_2-E_1 photon, which you say will only decay into E_1"?" You didn't write that - I did. That's my question. I assumed you were trying to answer my question.
Jun
18
comment Can one stimulate emission of a photon with an energy different from the emitted photon?
I think I know what you mean, it seems to be a matter of terminology. Let us forget 'stimulated emission' for a moment. A particle in E_1 can absorb a photon of energy E_2-E_1, right? That photon can subsequently decay into E_0, not only into E_2, right? Depending on how much E_0 is populated, this will result in an energy gain, right? Alas, I suspect the so emitted photons are not correlated. I am asking for something that shows this suspicion is either wrong or right.
Jun
17
comment Can one stimulate emission of a photon with an energy different from the emitted photon?
But why doesn't the E_2 state decay with some probability into the ground state after the E_1 level absorbed an E_2-E_1 photon? I mean, what's the difference between any electron in E_2 (which would decay with some probability into E_1 or E_0) and an electron that got there by absorbing an E_2-E_1 photon, which you say will only decay into E_1?
Jun
17
reviewed Approve Can one stimulate emission of a photon with an energy different from the emitted photon?
Jun
17
answered Has string theory been able to produce masses of elementary particles?
Jun
17
asked Can one stimulate emission of a photon with an energy different from the emitted photon?
May
20
accepted Do all vacua in the string theory landscape have a different cosmological constant?
May
19
comment Do all vacua in the string theory landscape have a different cosmological constant?
Ok, good, so the vacua could differ eg in the type of symmetry groups & particle content and still have the same CC, did I get that straight?
May
19
answered How can the electromagnetic stress energy tensor be restricted to flat space-time
May
19
asked Do all vacua in the string theory landscape have a different cosmological constant?
Feb
10
answered Is it possible to escape from within event horizon?
Feb
10
answered Does the speed of light in different mediums affect the lorentz transformation?
Feb
10
comment Spin version of Maxwell's demon: Where's the energy?
Thanks. I don't normally think of spin chains. I'd have expected the size of correlated regions to go to infinity with T to zero. In any case, the only thing that matters is that heating up the state means its total energy increases, but increases in a 'useless' way. I don't know how the total change of spin induced by a photon can even be zero. You're right in that I missed a factor two. Be that as it may, nothing of that solves my problem :(
Feb
8
asked Spin version of Maxwell's demon: Where's the energy?
Feb
8
comment Free Will Theorem question
Oh, it does have something to do with free will. Free will is a central assumption to the conclusions that they make. I agree though that the name is unfortunate because you can't actually conclude anything about something that you've just assumed to exist.
Feb
8
comment How to reconcile these two principles?
Look up the definition of "entanglement entropy": dividing space into different sections (as eg a horizon does) creates an entropy that is proportional to the surface area, even though the total entropy is zero.
Feb
8
answered Vacuum energy: black hole evaporation and cosmology - a discrepancy?