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seen Dec 16 at 7:14

Nov
12
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
6
comment What exactly are we doing when we set $c=1$?
Observed velocity of a light beam is always c, no matter the reference frame you're in. However, observed velocity of one's own reference frame is always 0 for an observer in that frame. An observer could choose a reference frame that's moving with respect to themselves, but it's usually easier (for the math) to consider the origin of the observer's reference frame fixed on the observer. Good instincts keeping an eye out, but internal reference frame velocity is typically zero. Semantics, heh.
May
14
comment Would this be a metric?
Good answer. Generally, a metric has to be nondegenerate (as Ben notes), symmetric (that is, switching rows to columns and vice-versa for the matrix representation gives you the same metric), and bilinear (vector arguments passed to the metric can be subdivided linearly). Anything else following tensor rules is allowed.
May
11
awarded  Critic
Feb
26
accepted Relationship between a formal vector derivative and time evolution of an operator
Feb
26
comment Relationship between a formal vector derivative and time evolution of an operator
Yes on the term rather than component- inaccurate wording there, sorry. Also good clarification on the connection to classical mechanics. Won't edit them, so that other people with similar misconceptions can correct them.
Feb
26
asked Relationship between a formal vector derivative and time evolution of an operator
Jan
27
awarded  Informed
Jan
27
awarded  Analytical
Jan
26
comment Quantum Computing Power Advantages
A nicely succinct answer; I still have to go with the other one thanks to the rousing entropy discussion. Cheers!
Jan
26
accepted Quantum Computing Power Advantages
Jan
25
awarded  Student
Jan
25
awarded  Supporter
Jan
25
asked Quantum Computing Power Advantages
Jan
24
awarded  Scholar
Jan
24
accepted Dense Spherical Black Hole Shell with a Region Inside
Jan
24
asked Dense Spherical Black Hole Shell with a Region Inside
Jan
21
comment What exactly are we doing when we set $c=1$?
By setting $c=1$, we still have a scale- it is simply in units of $c$. That is, I could say my velocity is 0.1 speeds of light.
Jan
21
awarded  Teacher
Jan
21
answered What exactly are we doing when we set $c=1$?