312 reputation
312
bio website
location Livermore, California
age 27
visits member for 4 years, 1 month
seen Jun 6 '12 at 22:16

I work in the exascale computing division at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, California. I have a Ph.D. in computational quantum chemistry and undergraduate degrees in computer science, mathematics, and chemistry. My focus is on scientific computing and massively parallel computing, but I have tangential interests all over the place—from language design to analysis of algorithms.

I love Python and C++. I passionately hate Fortran.

I like to make computers do cool things.


Jul
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awarded  Curious
Dec
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awarded  Popular Question
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awarded  Notable Question
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awarded  Taxonomist
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awarded  Popular Question
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awarded  Yearling
Feb
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awarded  Nice Question
Jan
31
accepted How small of a depletion signal can the best modern mass spectrometers detect?
Jan
27
comment How small of a depletion signal can the best modern mass spectrometers detect?
Can't fluctuations in signal be remedied by integrating over a long enough time span? Unless the fluctuations are non-random (which is a bigger problem anyway), won't the differences cancel out?
Jan
24
awarded  Commentator
Jan
24
comment How small of a depletion signal can the best modern mass spectrometers detect?
@Georg: That's actually the point. The most common use of depletion spectroscopy is in IR studies currently, but then again the most common technique in all of spectroscopy (at least in the chemistry world). But I'm actually interested in depletion spectroscopy in the X-ray energy range. As no examples yet exist for depletion spectroscopy in this energy range, the example I gave was from IR. There are some examples of depletion spectroscopy in the UV/Vis range, and my question pertains to those also. Thus, to simplify things, I simply used the term "depletion spectroscopy"
Jan
24
comment How small of a depletion signal can the best modern mass spectrometers detect?
@Georg: I agree with your assessment of the use of the term "spectroscopy," in that it is usually used in terms like IR spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray absorbance spectroscopy, etc. However, most papers I've read refer to the "category of spectroscopies" that measure spectroscopic information by measuring depletion of something in a molecular beam of some sort as "depletion spectroscopy" (as opposed to, for instance, the "categories" of absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, or raman spectroscopy, all of which span multiple wavelength ranges).
Jan
24
awarded  Promoter
Jan
22
revised Converting between brilliance, intensity, and flux
added the obvious "optics" tag that I forgot the first time
Jan
22
accepted Photon absorption probability for a given molecule in gas phase
Jan
21
accepted Can a multipass x-ray absorption cell be constructed?
Jan
21
accepted Do XAFS excitations and subsequent relaxations lead to vibrationally hot molecules?
Jan
21
asked Converting between brilliance, intensity, and flux
Jan
20
comment How small of a depletion signal can the best modern mass spectrometers detect?
Sorry, it seems depletion spectroscopy is a less ubiquitous technique than I thought. This paper uses the technique, and much of helium droplet isolation spectroscopy (review articles here and here) is based on the depletion spectroscopy technique. It is also often used with molecular beam spectroscopic experiments.
Jan
19
asked How small of a depletion signal can the best modern mass spectrometers detect?