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seen Oct 8 at 21:02

Oct
8
accepted why non orthogonal states are indistinguishable?
Oct
7
accepted A question on partial trace and density matrix computation
Oct
7
revised Dimension of separable state
deleted 144 characters in body
Oct
7
accepted Dimension of separable state
Oct
7
comment Intuition on positive-operator valued measures (POVM)
I think they are positive means they are positive definite?
Oct
5
awarded  Teacher
Oct
4
asked why non orthogonal states are indistinguishable?
Sep
2
comment A question on partial trace and density matrix computation
then it must be a $2\times 2$ matrix but in the book it is $3\times 2$ matrix
Sep
2
asked A question on partial trace and density matrix computation
Sep
1
comment Dimension of separable state
Thanks! I am trying to understand your point
Sep
1
comment Dimension of separable state
ah! algebraic geometry is everywhere! but I am such a poor fellow who doesn't understand, Thanks but sorry with my mathematics background I don't understand your answer
Sep
1
revised Dimension of separable state
added 7 characters in body
Sep
1
awarded  Scholar
Sep
1
revised $\exp(i\alpha\hat {\bf n}\cdot{\bf \sigma} )=\cos\alpha I+i(\hat {\bf n}\cdot{\bf \sigma})\sin\alpha$
edited title
Sep
1
accepted $\exp(i\alpha\hat {\bf n}\cdot{\bf \sigma} )=\cos\alpha I+i(\hat {\bf n}\cdot{\bf \sigma})\sin\alpha$
Sep
1
comment $\exp(i\alpha\hat {\bf n}\cdot{\bf \sigma} )=\cos\alpha I+i(\hat {\bf n}\cdot{\bf \sigma})\sin\alpha$
@gj255 Thank you for the reply
Sep
1
asked Dimension of separable state
Sep
1
comment $\exp(i\alpha\hat {\bf n}\cdot{\bf \sigma} )=\cos\alpha I+i(\hat {\bf n}\cdot{\bf \sigma})\sin\alpha$
And also $n_x,n_y,n_z$ are $1\times 3$ matrices and pauli matrcies are $2\times 2$ then why $n_x\sigma_x$ etc are defined?
Sep
1
comment $\exp(i\alpha\hat {\bf n}\cdot{\bf \sigma} )=\cos\alpha I+i(\hat {\bf n}\cdot{\bf \sigma})\sin\alpha$
Thanks but why Eigen Values of $A$ are $\pm1$?If $n=({1\over \sqrt{2}},{1\over\sqrt{2}},0)$ then $n_x=({1\over\sqrt{2}},0,0),n_y=(0,{1\over\sqrt{2}},0),n_z=(0,0,0)$ ?
Aug
31
awarded  Supporter