115 reputation
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location Tartu, Estonia
age 21
visits member for 1 year, 9 months
seen Oct 27 '13 at 16:19

Oct
27
comment Does this Bell's experiment actually disprove Local Hidden Variable Theories (LHVT)
From a wiki article: However, his results were not completely conclusive, since there were so-called loopholes that allowed for alternative explanations that comply with local realism.
Mar
3
accepted Does this Bell's experiment actually disprove Local Hidden Variable Theories (LHVT)
Jan
9
comment Does the amount of gravitational potential energy in the universe increase as it expands?
I.e. the potential energy needs to come from somewhere and it comes out of the kinetic energy of those 2 objects. (I know this is a circular statement, as it relies on the conversation of energy, but it's simply a way to look at what's happening)
Jan
9
comment Does the amount of gravitational potential energy in the universe increase as it expands?
The massive objects are still acting on each other gravitationally.
Dec
31
comment Does this Bell's experiment actually disprove Local Hidden Variable Theories (LHVT)
Maybe a comment to accompany the -1? A suggestion on how to improve the question? Or at least a note on which parts of it are weak. I'm quite new to QM, but my lack of knowledge in the field alone shouldn't merit a downvote. I'm here to learn and you (whoever you are) are definitely not helping. (Maybe you're helping the community by filtering out bad questions, but I'm obviously too close to it to view the action as such)
Dec
30
awarded  Editor
Dec
30
revised Einstein and vibrational energy of the atom and its way to QM
Added reference to the last question and improved the construction of the question.
Dec
30
suggested suggested edit on Einstein and vibrational energy of the atom and its way to QM
Dec
30
comment Does this Bell's experiment actually disprove Local Hidden Variable Theories (LHVT)
What I mean by syncing up is that the local hidden variables get the same (or opposite, or maybe even some other relationship) values if these particles are brought together. That way, if you now separate these particles, you still have the information that they were together at some point and based on this knowledge you can expect these particles to yield similar (or, once again, opposite or whatever) results under measurement. Using this expectation, you, by my understanding, could design two boxes that get better success rates than 75%, but that don't rely on QM.
Dec
30
asked Does this Bell's experiment actually disprove Local Hidden Variable Theories (LHVT)
Dec
2
awarded  Scholar
Dec
2
accepted Why are clouds wavy?
Nov
30
comment Why are clouds wavy?
I meant the PS part of the question. The question wasn't about how to explain these phenomena, but rather how to explain them simply, so a 10 year-old would get it.
Nov
30
comment Why are clouds wavy?
The son is fictional. I was asking about the second case.
Nov
30
comment Why are clouds wavy?
Read the PS part.
Nov
30
awarded  Student
Nov
30
comment What is the consequence of “infinite” gravitational force?
Basically, there's a lot of momentum left over from the Big Bang. (Tells me my intuition)
Nov
30
asked Why are clouds wavy?
Oct
29
awarded  Supporter