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Oct
24
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
8
answered Why the first Term is higher in energy than the second?
Oct
5
comment Why do electrons in an atom occupy only the stationary states?
This does not answer the question. You say that "atoms spend almost all of their time in an energy eigenstate", but OP knows that. He asks why do they spend almost all of their time in energy eigenstates? In other words, how do we know that? Does it comes from experimental observations (spectrum) or somewhere else?
Oct
5
comment Why do electrons in an atom occupy only the stationary states?
@lemon, it collapses to an eigenstate of an observable one measures, which is not necessarily the total energy.
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
16
comment Bond Angles - H2O vs CO2
Yes, I think, an isolated SiO2 molecule is linear. And the meaning of it being linear is exactly the same as with CO2. Actually, today for such small molecules consisting of light elements only anyone can prove this by doing calculation on their PCs at reasonably high level of theory.
Sep
15
revised Bond Angles - H2O vs CO2
added 2102 characters in body
Sep
15
comment Bond Angles - H2O vs CO2
@bobuhito, I'm pretty sure someone did high-level quantum chemistry calculation of CO2. And I'm pretty sure the equilibrium geometry they obtained was indeed linear.
Sep
15
revised Bond Angles - H2O vs CO2
added 2102 characters in body
Sep
13
comment Bond Angles - H2O vs CO2
Looks like it belongs to Chemistry.SE.
Sep
13
answered Bond Angles - H2O vs CO2
Aug
18
comment Why is thermodynamic equilibrium not reached by the system during a thermodynamic irreversible process?
Could you update your answer by quoting the definition of a reversible process from your book and also what is exactly said about irreversible processes being not in equilibrium?
Aug
17
comment Why is thermodynamic equilibrium not reached by the system during a thermodynamic irreversible process?
And finally, at the end of the day it all comes done to definitions, which you did not provide. Actually, some sources define a reversible process as a quasistatic process without entropy production. Thus, a system in a reversible process is always in equilibrium by the definition. A reversible process is nothing but a special limiting case of a quasistatic process. In an irreversible process a system might or might not be in equilibrium depending on is the process quasistatic or not.
Aug
17
comment Why is thermodynamic equilibrium not reached by the system during a thermodynamic irreversible process?
Secondly, thermodynamic equilibrium is reached in an irreversible process. Yes, it is reached at the very end of the process, but it is reached. Reading the body of your question I think you meant to ask why a system is not in equilibrium during an irreversible process. But such question has a little sense since a system actually can be in equilibrium during an irreversible process. A quasistatic process (a process in which system is all the way in equilibrium) might be irreversible.
Aug
17
comment Why is thermodynamic equilibrium not reached by the system during a thermodynamic irreversible process?
First, thermodynamic and thermal equilibrium are different things. Thermodynamic equilibrium implies thermal equilibrium, but the converse is not true. So be careful with using these terms interchangeably (thermodynamic equilibrium in the title and thermal in the body).
Aug
11
comment Which form of the first law of thermodynamics should I use?
@Manishearth sure. Actually, I did it already when wrote the comment about downvoting. Look at my answer below for details.
Aug
11
comment Which form of the first law of thermodynamics should I use?
Sorry, but -1 for $\Delta Q$ and $\Delta W$.
Aug
11
answered Which form of the first law of thermodynamics should I use?
Aug
4
revised Are isobaric, isochoric, and isothermal processes quasistatic by definition?
added 576 characters in body
Aug
4
accepted Are isobaric, isochoric, and isothermal processes quasistatic by definition?