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seen Oct 13 at 21:31

Sep
20
comment Potential that is proportional to distance
Can you give a hint about how you tried to solve the equation?
Sep
20
revised Potential that is proportional to distance
edited tags
Sep
20
accepted Potential that is proportional to distance
Sep
20
revised Potential that is proportional to distance
added 96 characters in body
Sep
20
comment Potential that is proportional to distance
@CuriousOne I do not really understand what you are trying to say. I believe it starts with $F(\vec{r}) = \vec{\nabla} V \sim \hat{r} $ where $\hat{r}$ is a vector with unit lenght everywhere, pointing at the centre.
Sep
20
revised Potential that is proportional to distance
edited title
Sep
20
comment Potential that is proportional to distance
@JohnRennie Ok, a movement in 2D and a potential in 3D.
Sep
20
comment Potential that is proportional to distance
@John Rennie, 3D actually, see my edit. It may be a simple case, but I feel unsure and would appreciate an experts opinion.
Sep
20
revised Potential that is proportional to distance
added 200 characters in body
Sep
20
awarded  Custodian
Sep
20
reviewed Approve suggested edit on What is a conservative force?
Sep
20
asked Potential that is proportional to distance
Aug
24
asked Spatial configuration of quarks?
Aug
18
comment How can helicity be conserved but chirality not?
You put a lot of effort and a lot of theory in this answer, still it doesn't help me to understand how the chirality can change in time and helicity not. Perhaps you can elaborate on the sub-question: what kind of process is it, that evolves a r-h-ch. component? At time t=0 there is 100% l-h-ch. Where does the r-h-ch. component come from?
Aug
16
asked How can helicity be conserved but chirality not?
Jul
21
accepted Neutrino annihilation and bosons
Jul
21
asked Neutrino annihilation and bosons
Jul
9
comment How do I describe two entangled electrons in the same state except for a different spin
Thank you for taking the time to explain.
Jul
9
accepted How do I describe two entangled electrons in the same state except for a different spin
Jul
9
comment How do I describe two entangled electrons in the same state except for a different spin
The "spin property" as I understand it, is that when $\psi$ is the wave function of an electron with some position, energy, spin direction etc. then the wave function of the same electron with opposite spin direction must be multiplied with -1.