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Feb
5
comment The impatient hot tub owner
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is not about physics
Feb
5
comment Man on a rotating platform
Please note that this is not a homework help site. Please see this Meta post on asking homework questions and this Meta post for "check my work" problems.
Feb
5
comment Find the angle of the projectile
Hi Ilan and welcome to the Physics SE! Please note that this is not a homework help site. Please see this Meta post on asking homework questions and this Meta post for "check my work" problems.
Feb
5
comment Can we obtain interference pattern with single electron/photon in Young's double slit experiment?
See also: Single photon and double-slit experiment. We encourage new members to do a basic search of the site before posting to see if their questions has already been asked.
Feb
5
comment Is the empty space really empty?
Possible duplicate of Are vacuum fluctuations really happening all the time?
Feb
5
comment Why does time stop its flow?
Possible duplicate of Is a photon "fixed in spacetime"?
Feb
5
comment Path of a swinging object on a rope
Hi Peter, this is a comment not an answer
Feb
5
comment Conservation of energy in vertical circular motion
Yes, that looks fine
Feb
5
comment Is mass in the sub-atomic particles caused by their angular momentum?
Matt Strassler gives the simplest explanation of the Higgs mechanism that I've seen. It will still require some work from you though.
Feb
5
comment Conservation of energy in vertical circular motion
The centripetal force does no work because it always acts along the radius vector and the length of the radius vector never changes.
Feb
5
comment Will Buoyant Force Change If The Container is Accelerated Up or Down?
@Freelancer: this would apply to horizontal acceleration as well. See for example Why does a helium filled ballon move forward in a car when the car is accelerating?.
Feb
5
comment Can this Temperature Scale be Considered an absolute temperature scale?
@prakharlondhe: correct - there is no restriction on the absolute temperature scale to be non linear
Feb
4
comment Can this Temperature Scale be Considered an absolute temperature scale?
The Dalton scale is a temperature scale in the sense that you can consistently measure temperatures with it. But you would have to be barking mad to actually attempt to use the Dalton scale in thermodynamic calculations.
Feb
4
comment Can this Temperature Scale be Considered an absolute temperature scale?
The Kelvin scale is linear in the sense that for an ideal gas the internal energy is proportional to the temperature. So each extra degree K adds the same increment of internal energy. If you want your Namu scale $T_N$ to preserve this linearity then it needs to be related to the Kelvin scale $T_K$ by $T_N = aT_K + b$ where $a$ and $b$ are constants. I'm guessing this is what you mean by your expression mK + c. If you're not fussed about the linearity then you could use a more general scale, but all your equations will get more complicated if you do.
Feb
4
comment Why is power dissipated in a circuit maximum when external resistance is equal to the internal resistance in the circuit?
Current is a maximum when $R_\text{ext}=0$ not when $R_\text{ext}=R_\text{int}$.
Feb
4
comment Can this Temperature Scale be Considered an absolute temperature scale?
@prakharlondhe: Yes, your Namu scale is a perfectly good absolute temperature scale.
Feb
4
comment Interpretation of time dilation
Hi Mason. I think Alfred and Jon are being a bit unkind, because most of your answer is just fine and you correctly pull out the key point that the proper time along a photon trajectory is always zero (this is true in general relativity as well). However I agree that the sentence So, that means that if you travel at the speed of light, you observe no time passing! is meaningless and you should edit it out.
Feb
4
comment Why is power dissipated in a circuit maximum when external resistance is equal to the internal resistance in the circuit?
I suspect the book means that the maximum power dissipated in the load $R$ is when $R=3$. If you set $R=0$ then the power dissipated in $R$ is obviously zero, and if you set $R=\infty$ the power dissipated in $R$ is obviously zero. So the maximum of the power dissipated in $R$ is somewhere in between. With a bit of algebra you can easily show the maximum is at $R=3$.
Feb
4
comment Why neutrinos are weakly interacting?
Hi Muthu, we encourage new users to search the site to check if there question, or one very like it, has been asked before. In this case the obvious search quickly finds the duplicate I've suggested.
Feb
4
comment Why neutrinos are weakly interacting?
Possible duplicate of Why are neutrinos more weakly interacting than light?