117,172 reputation
5183312
bio website ratsauce.co.uk
location Chester, United Kingdom
age 53
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen 2 hours ago

Semi retired old time computer nerd who started programming on a Commodore Pet.

Since I'm also active in the Physics forum I should add that I started as a theoretical chemist, moved into solid state photochemistry and finally worked in industry as a colloid scientist. I only became a full time computer nerd in 1997.


Dec
17
comment What is the most compelling evidence of General Relativity in the presence of matter and energy?
@Bridgeburners: I'd guess CuriousOne is referring to gravitational wave radiation from the Hulse-Taylor binary.
Dec
17
comment Force needed to push a syringe plunger: does one add force associated with downstream back-pressure to frictional plunger force?
A.L. Verminburger: thanks for the edit suggestion, but I'm using the sign convention the OP uses. It's not one I particularly approve of, but I think your suggestion of a more cohenert sign convention would confuse matters.
Dec
17
comment Can Einstein's 'Theory of General Relativity' exist in Harmony with 'Quantum Mechanics'?
There are a million articles on the issues involved with reconciling GR and QM lurking out there in Googlespace just a quick search away. As it stands this is far too broad a question to be usefully answered here. If you want to do a bit of reading around this area we'd be happy to help with any technical issues.
Dec
17
comment can we detect the photons in the interaction of two charged bodies?
@P.A.M: virtual photons aren't really photons
Dec
17
comment can we detect the photons in the interaction of two charged bodies?
@P.A.M A free EM wave is not the same as virtual photons and shouldn't be confused with them. Virtual particles are just a computational trick.
Dec
17
comment At what point do researchers in physics make the leap from wild theoretical ideas to physical experiments?
I don't think this can be usefully answered here. The process by which funding committees decide an experimental programme is worth funding does not obey any physical laws that I'm aware of.
Dec
16
comment Why should we believe in clock hypothesis?
A paper that wasn't published anywhere and isn't cited anywhere?
Dec
16
comment How do I calculate the most probable orbital an electron is in?
Though I guess if you calculate $\psi^*\psi dV$ for all the different orbitals this would give you the relative probabilities that the electron is in the different orbitals. Is that what you meant?
Dec
16
comment How do I calculate the most probable orbital an electron is in?
@Kainui: the electron distribution is a statistical one i.e. it gives the probability of finding the electron in a volume element $dV$. If you do a single experiment this tells you nothing about which orbital the electron is in. You'd have to do many such measurements. Even finding an electron where (for example) $\psi_{2s} = 0$ doesn't prove the electron isn't in a $2s$ state because you're always measuring a finite volume element and the wavefunction isn't zero everywhere in any finite volume element.
Dec
16
comment Why should we believe in clock hypothesis?
@sure: no I don't think so. If you could come up with an experimental (even only theoretical) result that differed from the predictions SR makes with the clock postulate you would have my attention. However I know of no such result.
Dec
16
comment Pauli exclusion principle for the protons in water
I'm puzzled by the votes to close as unclear as it seems perfectly clear what Nick is asking. The question is certainly based on a misapprehension, but that doesn't make it unclear.
Dec
16
comment Can antiprotons make stable bounds with halogens?
Like protonium?
Dec
16
comment Why should we believe in clock hypothesis?
@sure: possibly, though this sounds like a different question. My point is that assuming the clock postulate is true you can handle acceleration in SR with only minor swearing and by doing so you would indeed predict different observables in different accelerating frames. So you can't turn the argument round and say that having different observables in different accelerating frames invalidates the clock postulate.
Dec
16
comment Can antiprotons make stable bounds with halogens?
@Ruslan: actually, yes I agree. The anti-proton orbital would be so close to the nucleus that to all intents and purposes the nucleus would appear to be similar to a $^{36}$S nucleus.
Dec
16
comment What are the most likely technology advancements that will result from NASA manned missions to asteroids & Mars?
The list you've linked plays fast and loose with the real history of science.
Dec
16
comment Can antiprotons make stable bounds with halogens?
@Ruslan: erm, possibly. I'd have to sit down and think about this. You'd have a $Cl^-$ ion but with seven electrons in its outer shell so maybe it would form a stable $Cl^{2-}$ ion, in which case I guess it would react a bit like a group 6 element. It would be a great experiment, though probably a rather hard one :-)
Dec
16
comment Why should we believe in clock hypothesis?
@sure: you say In this sense, even if to accelerate does not act on space time, it acts on the physics observed and this I agree with. What you observe will indeed vary with your four-acceleration, just as it does for the Schwarzschild horizon. But I don't see why this bears upon the validity or otherwise of the clock postulate.
Dec
16
comment Why should we believe in clock hypothesis?
@sure: What we call the event horizon is a coordinate singularity, and is a result of the coordinate choice we've made i.e. the Schwarzschild coordinates. Jump into a black hole and you will encounter no horizon - in the coordinates of a freely falling observer there is no coordinate singularity. By contrast the singularity at the centre is a real singularity due to the curvature becoming infinite, and all observers in all coordinate systems will agree that it's there.
Dec
16
comment Why Do Clouds Precipitate Rather than Fall From the Sky?
The water droplet size in clouds is small enough that the rate of fall is negligable. Are you really asking what causes these water droplets to coalesce then fall as raindrops?
Dec
16
comment Ways to measure the focal length of a convex lens with only natural sun light
This question appears to be off-topic because it shows insufficient willingness to get off your butt.