116,737 reputation
5182312
bio website ratsauce.co.uk
location Chester, United Kingdom
age 53
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen 4 hours ago

Semi retired old time computer nerd who started programming on a Commodore Pet.

Since I'm also active in the Physics forum I should add that I started as a theoretical chemist, moved into solid state photochemistry and finally worked in industry as a colloid scientist. I only became a full time computer nerd in 1997.


Jul
30
reviewed Close Woodwind instruments overtones
Jul
30
comment What is the difference between a low vs. high entropy plasma just after and before a singularity occurs?
Your observations of the universe (correctly) show that entropy was low just after the Big Bang and has been increasing since. However the same observations show the universe is expanding and won't recollapse. So you can't appeal to observation to support the claim that entropy must transition from high to low during a Big Bounce.
Jul
29
awarded  Good Answer
Jul
29
revised In a Big Crunch, would there be more mass than at the Big Bang?
Typo
Jul
29
awarded  Enlightened
Jul
29
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
29
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
29
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
29
reviewed Approve Determine the electric field
Jul
29
reviewed No Action Needed How laminar or turbulent is air?
Jul
29
reviewed No Action Needed Determine the electric field
Jul
29
revised Cooling down a container in outer space
It's cold in space
Jul
29
comment Cooling down a container in outer space
@kutschkem: oops! Thanks :-)
Jul
29
reviewed Approve Fluid flow at mach 1
Jul
29
reviewed No Action Needed Equivalent resistance in ladder circuit
Jul
29
answered Maximum curvature in a black hole
Jul
29
comment What is the difference between a low vs. high entropy plasma just after and before a singularity occurs?
No-one knows. The question about why the entropy was so low just after the Big Bang is still an open one and there is no widely accepted mechanism to explain it.
Jul
29
comment Does expanding space cost energy?
There are endless arguments about whether energy is or isn't conserved in the expansion due to dark energy. One view is that it isn't because the amount of dark energy increases with time as the universe expands. An opposing view is that this increase is balanced out by the energy of the gravitational field and overall energy really is conserved. See this article by Luboš Motl and this article by Phil Gibbs for opposing views
Jul
29
answered Does yukawa potential of two particles have effect on each other?
Jul
29
reviewed Approve Why are the orbits of planets in the Solar System nearly circular?