146,938 reputation
13250412
bio website ratsauce.co.uk
location Chester, United Kingdom
age 54
visits member for 4 years, 7 months
seen 3 hours ago

Semi retired old time computer nerd who started programming on a Commodore Pet.

Since I'm also active in the Physics forum I should add that I started as a theoretical chemist, moved into solid state photochemistry and finally worked in industry as a colloid scientist. I only became a full time computer nerd in 1997.


May
9
answered One-body General Relativity
May
9
reviewed Looks OK Is redshift possible if relative speed is 0?
May
9
reviewed No Action Needed Chemical potential
May
9
reviewed Close One-body General Relativity
May
9
reviewed Leave Open Electrostatic force has longer range than strong nuclear force?
May
9
reviewed Leave Open Since the gravitational force is only attractive, why does matter not just concentrate into a small sphere?
May
8
awarded  Nice Answer
May
8
comment Can adding weight to something make it tilt slower?
@BenVoigt: eh? The term in the brackets is $\frac{m+2M}{m+3M}$ so my argument is correct. If the term was $\frac{m+2M}{2m+3M}$ I wouldn't have used that argument.
May
8
comment Can adding weight to something make it tilt slower?
@Name: I strongly advise against the taking of shortcuts unless you're absolutely confident you understand the underlying physics. For example in this case increasing $M$ does indeed increase $I$, but it also increases $T$. Is it obvious which increase is greater? I'm not sure I would have wanted to bet on it before I'd done the maths.
May
8
comment Time dilation, reference frame
Hmm, I think this answer got away from me a bit. I thought it would be an opportunity to give a simple explanation of how time dilation works, but I'm not sure it's all that simple. Oh well, I'll leave the answer here in case anyone fins it useful.
May
8
revised Can adding weight to something make it tilt slower?
Oops
May
8
answered Time dilation, reference frame
May
8
answered Can adding weight to something make it tilt slower?
May
8
comment Electrostatic force has longer range than strong nuclear force?
The atoms with the largest nuclei are not stable and fly apart in exactly the fashion you describe.
May
8
revised Particle Horizon and CMB
Add link and minor clarifications
May
8
comment Light coming from distant stars
@Name: since the distance between us and distant galaxies is increasing with time a common sense interpretation is that the universe is getting bigger, so expanding seems to me to be a perfectly good word to use.
May
8
answered Particle Horizon and CMB
May
8
comment Light coming from distant stars
@Name: this has been covered extensively on this site. An infinite universe can still have a scale factor that increases with time. See for example the description of how the expansion works in this question.
May
8
comment Measuring Hawking radiation after the coordinate transformation
See Hawking radiation from point of view of a falling observer.
May
8
answered Force Needed To Maintain Velocity, Increasing Mass