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Nov
26
comment Why escape velocity doesnot depend on angle of projection
Hi Joey. The question I've linked explains why the escape speed doesn't depend on direction. It's because energy is a scalar not a vector.
Nov
26
reviewed Approve Why escape velocity doesnot depend on angle of projection
Nov
26
comment Why is the trajectory of the alpha particle in a cloud chamber almost straight?
My recollection of beta ray trails (in a cloud chamber) is that they are visibly lss well defined than alpha ray trais precisely because they are scattered more. Very high energy particles, e.g. electrons from collisions in the LHC, do travel straight. If you want to know why very high energy particles travel in straight lines then that would be worth a new question. I'm tempted to over-simplify and say it's because very high energy particles have a high relativistic mass, though my fellow physicists would condemn me for even mentioning relativistic mass :-)
Nov
26
revised Is there a relationship between kinetic energy of emitted electron and photoelectric current?
Typo
Nov
26
answered Is there a relationship between kinetic energy of emitted electron and photoelectric current?
Nov
26
comment Why are harmonic oscillators quantized?
A macroscopic mass on a macroscopic spring won't have quantised energy levels, even in principle, because it won't remain coherent for long enough. Quantum oscillators are quantised and describing them is a routine part of any quantum physics course. If you're interested you need to go off and read up about it. Describing the details here would require a review length answer.
Nov
26
answered Galileo 5 and 6 satellites testing gravitational time dilation
Nov
26
comment Why don't we include angular acceleration while calculating net acceleration for a particle moving in a circle ?
@IshitaGupta: The difference from Newton's 2nd law is that mass is a scalar so $\vec{F}$ and $\vec{a}$ point in the same direction.
Nov
26
comment Quantum Mechanics in your face
Yes, Coleman does say that. Coleman is essentially describing the many worlds interpretation of QM. Incidentally this is an excellent lecture and I strongly recommend it to amateur physicists - experienced physicists will find it rather basic though quite fun.
Nov
26
reviewed Close What is the potential difference between $a$ and $b$ in this basic circuit, when the switch is open?
Nov
26
reviewed Close How do quantum particles interact with each other?
Nov
26
comment How do quantum particles interact with each other?
I'm afraid it's unclear what you are asking here
Nov
26
comment Quantum Mechanics in your face
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's about what Sidney Coleman said not about physics
Nov
26
revised What is the general relativity explanation for why objects at the center of the Earth are weightless?
Clarify
Nov
25
answered Working of electric-tester
Nov
25
reviewed No Action Needed Stokes' theorem in complex coordinates (CFT)
Nov
25
answered Why does the mass on the cart-pole have to fall?
Nov
25
revised Why is the trajectory of the alpha particle in a cloud chamber almost straight?
Oops
Nov
25
comment Why is the trajectory of the alpha particle in a cloud chamber almost straight?
@MartyGreen: true but a few multiples of very small is still very small.
Nov
25
answered Head on collision of two black holes