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Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Oct
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Oct
1
comment Calculating laser wavelength/power to cause emission of light in a gas?
I am not sure if that's entirely correct. two-photon electron microscopy (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two-photon_excitation_microscopy) suggests that two lower-energy photons can occur, although I am NOT saying I understand the article completely. felix3d.com/web/download/paper_pw_03.pdf also mentions two-frequency, two-step upconversion which is where I got the idea in the first place. It specifically mentions optically-active atoms, molecules or ions as a requirement.
Oct
1
comment Calculating laser wavelength/power to cause emission of light in a gas?
I was looking at the idea of using two laser beams to excite gas molecules to the point of emitting visible light. Individually the lasers would not have enough energy to do this but rather the combined energy input to the gas where they intersect being high enough to raise outer-shell electron energy to emit a photon. I read a few papers on using infrared lasers (which would be invisible to the eye) in order to help contrast, but before I even get that far I'm trying to figure out how to determine how much energy is needed and what the effect of the laser wavelength is.
Oct
1
comment Can 2 beams of ultraviolet light intersect and be visible where they intersect?
If we introduce a medium (gas, crystal) that absorbs the ultraviolet light from the lasers, can a different (lower) wavelength be emitted? It's possible to get a higher (visible) wavelength emitted from absorption from two infrared lasers, but I'm not sure about the opposite.
Oct
1
asked Calculating laser wavelength/power to cause emission of light in a gas?