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revised How do we know particles exist? Aren't they just waves?
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comment How do we know particles exist? Aren't they just waves?
I made an edit to my question in order to explain the comment above.
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revised How do we know particles exist? Aren't they just waves?
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comment How do we know particles exist? Aren't they just waves?
Thank you. But this doesn't really answers the question. How do we know that particles in standard model aren't just our interpretation of waves measurements? What are the evidences for that?
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asked How do we know particles exist? Aren't they just waves?
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accepted Does matter with negative mass exist?
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comment Does matter with negative mass exist?
let us continue this discussion in chat
Nov
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comment Does matter with negative mass exist?
This is correct. But since a) mass is a scalar (not vector); and b) $\vec{r_{AB}}=-\vec{r_{BA}}$; then: $\vec F_{AB}=-\vec F_{BA}$;
Nov
23
comment Does matter with negative mass exist?
can you please give a reference to such explanation? I think it's wrong. Otherwise, positive mass would also suffer from this chase-escape problem ( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravitation_constant) because the force vector is defined towards the other object, and so it's always opposite for them.
Nov
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comment Does matter with negative mass exist?
Many thanks for the answer. But I don't understand the "negative mass "following" the positive mass" phenomena. If you use positive and negative mass in the universal gravitation formula, the result is negative force. But it's applied on opposite directions for both objects, so the must both repel each other. Why doesn't it happen with particles with opposite electric charges?
Nov
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comment Does Earth's Rotation Affect Its Shape?
@EMACK, The disk shape is a trade-off between gravitational force to the Earth's center, and centrifugal force due to rotation. The centrifugal force is zero on poles and the largest on the equator. But you can find much more detailed and numeric answer on the link posted by Qmechanic.
Nov
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comment Does matter with negative mass exist?
"How do you know that..." -I don't know that. I was looking for information on this topic and found those statements in Wikipedia (you can see a link there). So, I asked this question here. Thank you for the answer.
Nov
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comment Does matter with negative mass exist?
@LuboŇ°Motl, I understand that mass is a property of matter, I used the term "negative matter" just because it's used in the articles that I found. Thank you for the link, I will read it.
Nov
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comment Does Earth's Rotation Affect Its Shape?
@EMACK, definitely the rotation gives the Earth the shape of a disk, rather than a sphere. The distance to the Earth center is less on the poles than it's on the equator. It also affects the gravitation g that is measured at sea level on poles or equator.