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comment Falling Raindrop with Asymptotic Acceleration
FYI, I think you left out density when substituting for $m$.
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answered Where does the energy go in a rocket when no work is done?
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answered Trying to modify the Tsiolkovsky rocket equation for the real world
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answered Temperature rise in Thermosphere
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comment Rocket thrust over time
"is the thrust in newtons the force per second?" No, the thrust (in Newtons) is the force. To get the change in impulse over a half second, you can multiply the thrust by 0.5 seconds, if this is sufficiently short for your numerical preferences.
Aug
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revised Is a turbine the same thing as a motor?
technical correctness
Aug
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answered Is a turbine the same thing as a motor?
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comment Surface charge on a straight region of a conductor
Well, there is no gradient along the length of the wire if its the hypothetical infinite example. It will exist for other circumstances, but all of the specifics depend on the situation you're interested in.
Jul
29
comment Calculating the drag force provided by a laminar flow
Restrictions for high numbers? Not likely. Consider atmospheric reentry - projectiles will vaporize before the drag equation loses its validity. This is because the equation is valid for totally ballistic particle collisions. The drag coefficient will change, but that's always dependent on the specific flow pattern anyway. Even when the mean free path is larger than the projectile, it works. Just assume there is just a column of particles in front that bounce off in some constant angle, you get the v^2 form. That's different from the normal application, but it's also strangely the same...