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seen Apr 25 '13 at 7:22

Aug
27
awarded  Necromancer
Aug
2
awarded  Yearling
Apr
24
comment phase transition by sublimation
Without such a theory, one cannot explain the triple point gas-liquid-solid. This was, at least, a status about 10 years ago, when I stopped to follow these works. I would be delighted, if something have changed since that time.
Apr
24
comment phase transition by sublimation
The answers given above are not the explanations, but more the statements of this same fact in more accurate terms. The explanation should appeal to a theory of the phenomenon. I, however, have never seen such a theory before. I may guess that this is due to the fact that the crystallization transition is very poorly understood. As much as I know, only a so-called, weak crystallization theory is developed (see e.g. Kats et al, Physics Reports, 228, pp. 1–91 (1993)). The weak crystallization, however, does not describe such cases as the CO2 mentioned above.
Mar
12
answered What is the minimum optical power detectable by human eye?
Feb
20
comment Gravity Question Can this be reopened?
even before that time huge shells were possible. Now they are not just since the environment has changed since.
Feb
20
comment Gravity Question Can this be reopened?
I do not believe much in the meteorites Earth mass growth. May be since I do not know numbers, though. However, the evolution of the dinos (as well as others ancient life forms) should be considered together with the evolution of the atmosphere and water content on the Earth. This places the question into a biophysical content. The statement is that the gases in atmosphere and composition of water were different at that time with respect to the present state. This has strong impact on the biochemistry of the creatures. At that time huge animals were possible,
Feb
20
answered Entropy and Crystal Growth
Feb
15
answered Order of phase transition: Which free energy to use?
Jan
15
answered Statistics in physics
Jan
15
answered Cases of any known fundamental physical constants changing within our locality?
Nov
26
answered First order phase transition in a classical system
Nov
26
answered renormalization group in d=3
Nov
14
answered State-dependent diffusions: Fick's law vs. Fokker-Planck's, which and why?
Nov
12
comment Does high entropy means low symmetry?
This is OK, if you make a theory, but may become inconvenient as soon as you need to describe experiment. Indeed, who can measure the internal energy of a body? And the temperature and volume are easily measured.
Nov
12
awarded  Commentator
Nov
12
comment Does high entropy means low symmetry?
Second to answer juangra. Each of them: entropy Gibbs potential ans so on are true thermodynamic potentials. No one is better than the others. One only needs to use them in their own thermodynamic coordinates. For example, the free energy should be used with the variables T, V and N, while the large thermodynamic potential \Omega - with T, V and \mu (the chemical potential). The entropy is like all of them. It is a potential which is not better and not worse than others. However, one of its variables is the internal energy. Have a look into the volume 5 of Landau and Lifshitz.
Nov
12
comment Does high entropy means low symmetry?
First to answer to TMS. If you have the entropy, S, that has an absolute minimum, the value -S has an absolute maximum in the same point. Just try to plot them.
Nov
7
answered Is this Landau's other critical phenomena mistake?
Nov
7
answered Does high entropy means low symmetry?