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bio website greennotes.com.sg
location Jakarta
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visits member for 2 years, 2 months
seen Oct 31 at 8:47

Oct
31
awarded  Supporter
Oct
30
comment Do electrons in absorption spectra absorb photons with enough energy to release them from their parent atoms?
Let's take hydrogen. The ground state is -13.6eV. So the electron can absorb any photons equal or larger than 13.6eV. The next excited state is -3.4eV. So this electron can absorb any photon larger than 3.4eV, which includes all the energies up to 13.6eV photons and beyond. By progressing up the excited states, we will come to conclude that photons of most energies higher than the amount needed by the most excited electrons) will be absorbed, thus eliminating any absorption patterns.
Oct
30
comment Do electrons in absorption spectra absorb photons with enough energy to release them from their parent atoms?
Yes that's exactly what I meant. So if that is the case, wouldn't there be no dark lines anymore, since only the lowest energy electrons will absorb to produce one dark line, while it will absorb all frequencies above this, thus negating any effect of the higher electrons' absorption of photons.
Oct
30
comment Do electrons in absorption spectra absorb photons with enough energy to release them from their parent atoms?
I understand your point but my question suggests that electrons should be able to absorb photons of most frequencies rather than those that just correspond to the energy level differences.
Oct
30
asked Do electrons in absorption spectra absorb photons with enough energy to release them from their parent atoms?
Jun
4
awarded  Scholar
Jun
4
accepted Which quantity gives the resistance of a component?
Jun
4
comment Which quantity gives the resistance of a component?
Then the resistance would be $2 \Omega$ (in the graph) if I understood you correctly?
Jun
4
awarded  Editor
Jun
4
revised Which quantity gives the resistance of a component?
Clarify question with diagram.
Jun
4
comment Which quantity gives the resistance of a component?
There will also be a gradient even if component s not ohmic. It's just that the gradient is not constant.
Jun
4
comment Which quantity gives the resistance of a component?
Then which option gives the correct answer to resistance? coordinate of v / coordinate of current or inverse-gradient of current-voltage graph?
Jun
4
comment Which quantity gives the resistance of a component?
I am not talking about input voltage (emf). I am talking about potential difference in a load, such as a resistor. Ohm's law states that the current through a resistor is directly proportional to the p.d. across. If I talk about a general component that do not obey Ohm's law, then resistance is just the value obtained when I divide the p.d. by the current across (by doing an experiment). Resistance is empirical. So how can resistance be calculated by taking gradient since it is not even change in voltage over current?
Jun
4
comment Which quantity gives the resistance of a component?
This doesn't answer my question. I know what Ohm's law is.
Jun
4
awarded  Student
Jun
4
asked Which quantity gives the resistance of a component?
Mar
15
awarded  Teacher
Sep
25
comment Why is the solar noon time different every day?
So that users will not anyhow downvote others. But I agree my error. I should have mention its the highest point of the observer at that latitude, not the zenith.
Sep
25
answered Why is the solar noon time different every day?