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bio website ellipsix.net
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I'm a graduate student in physics doing research in high-energy particle physics. I also have a hobby interest in computer programming.

You can find me on Twitter, or check out my blog and personal website!

For matters not related to Stack Exchange, I can be contacted by email at stack@ellipsix.net.


35m
comment Can we physically “time travel” to the future?
Please take any extended discussion to Physics Chat.
14h
comment Difference between two equations
@AlanSE I'd suggest posting that as an answer
1d
comment How fast would a truck have to go to pull a pedestrian onto the road?
Or, questions like "I tried method A but I can't understand how to get from step B to step C" are also good. Note that there are many ways to improve a question like this, and what I've outlined in the last comment is only one of them, so don't feel like you have to follow that exact template. I'd suggest checking some of the examples of good questions in our homework policy for inspiration.
1d
comment How fast would a truck have to go to pull a pedestrian onto the road?
What would really help this question is if you were to show some effort to solve it yourself. In a nutshell, we tend to react badly to questions that say only "calculate this thing for me" or "tell me how to do this" (which is kind of what you're doing). A better question would be if you say something like "I searched Google to see if this had been done before, I tried calculating it using method X but that didn't work because Y, and then I tried method Z but that didn't work because Z'. Is there some other method that will work?"
1d
comment Sum of forces with liquid in rotation
Don't worry about it this time. Just save your edits in the future for when you really need to fix something important. And when you have a good reason to make an edit, go through and make all the little improvements you can find at the same time, all as part of the same edit.
1d
comment Sum of forces with liquid in rotation
Hi user43880; please don't edit your question so often. Every edit bumps the question up to the top of the front page, taking attention from other deserving questions.
1d
comment Mass or no mass?
I think this question is kind of messy... it seems like you're asking too many things at once.
2d
comment Is the moment of a force the same about any point?
Yes, that's what I said.
2d
comment Classical Scattering of Slow Neutrons by a Diatomic Molecule
I think this is really close to being an on-topic question, but I couldn't find what concept you're asking about. Could you clarify more what conceptual issue is tripping you up on part (b)?
2d
comment Calculating kWh from time series of kW
@DumpsterDoofus well, what makes something an answer vs. a comment is not whether it's simple or not. It's a matter of whether it answers the question or not. There are many times when a valid answer is simple enough to be written in a comment and yet should still be posted as an answer. Another good rule of thumb: comments are temporary. Anything that is useful in the long term should be either edited into the question or posted as an answer. (BTW I will come back and clean up the comments here after the discussion is over.)
2d
comment Calculating kWh from time series of kW
Incidentally, this question seems to me to be about the very basics of numerical integration. I don't think it's off topic (although I could see that being debatable), but I have a vague feeling it might be a duplicate of something we already have. Unfortunately I can't find a specific question it would be a duplicate of.
2d
comment Calculating kWh from time series of kW
@DumpsterDoofus I think it would really be better if you post your answer as an answer, not as a comment.
2d
comment Who was the R. Dolen behind Dolen-Horn-Schmid duality?
I don't think this is on topic for us anyway.
2d
comment Why don't the kinematic equations agree with calculating velocity one second at a time?
@LDC3 yes, I edited the title of this question, but that's not relevant to what I was saying.
2d
comment Why don't the kinematic equations agree with calculating velocity one second at a time?
I would have thought this would be a duplicate of another question - I really think I've seen another one like this, but I can't seem to find it now.
Apr
20
comment Why is $\vert I=1,I_3=1\rangle = -p\bar n$
@QuantumDot that's not a good reason to downvote a question. It would be better to edit your answer, or delete it if you don't want to have an answer posted anymore. See also this proposal on MSE.
Apr
19
comment How long would it take to get to Kepler 189f?
Perhaps because it's not a very interesting question. You're basically just asking us to do some calculations for you. Why wouldn't you just do them yourself? There's nothing particularly enlightening about these calculations that would make them interesting to anyone else.
Apr
18
comment Charge within cavity of conductor
Hi user246694; questions like this are off topic here, as described in the close notice below. Please take a look at our homework policy before asking any more questions, so that you'll understand how to ask questions that are appropriate for this site.
Apr
17
comment A free jet of liquid (incompressible) strikes a wedge as shown in figure below
Hi PleaseHelpMeOut, and welcome to Physics Stack Exchange! This is not a homework help site, so the sorts of questions you're asking are off topic. If you would like to post questions here, please take a look at our homework policy and make sure you're asking conceptual questions after having shown some effort to work through the problem.
Apr
17
comment Normalizing the sum of wavefunctions and calculating probabilty - understanding concepts
(1) It's not true that $\phi_1(x)\phi_1^*(x) = 1$. The product $\phi_1(x)\phi_1^*(x)$ is a function, which will in general vary with $x$. Only when you integrate it do you get 1. (2) I had made a mistake by omitting the absolute value signs; $a^*a = \lvert a^2\rvert$, not $a^2$, but accounting for that, yes that is the reason you get $\lvert a\rvert^2 + \lvert b\rvert^2 = 1$. (3) Exercise for the reader :-) Try the procedure I showed you on that function and see if it's normalized.