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awarded  Enlightened
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awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
4
comment When were quarks discovered?
If it's hard to deal with Wikipedia, click here and read a few paragraphs: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quark#History
Feb
4
comment How does the Moon influence atmospheric pressure?
Thanks ;-) In particle physics, it's being used in this way the two of us understood since early 1990s when Paul Ginsparg established two archives at arxiv.org, particle physics "theory" and "phenomenology". The latter - new term in particle physics - was meant to be an application of science to actual phenomena, with the focus on what is observed (phenomena), not what is behind it. It contrasts with "theory" that tries to explain the reasons as carefully as you can. That's very different from psychology and philosophy where "phenomenology" studies (phenomenon of) consciousness only.
Feb
4
comment Ferromagnets - Permanent?
The point is that you can't really "fully demagnetize" a ferromagnetic material everywhere. When a ferromagnetic material is no overall magnetic field, it only means that it's divided to lots of small domains which are individually magnetized but in total, they mostly cancel. Small enough domains of a ferromagnetic material are always "permanent magnets". And yes, I think that it's the same for ferrimagnets. The residual field may also differ in small domains but they may be aligned.
Feb
4
comment How does the Moon influence atmospheric pressure?
I am sure we have similar confusions. I don't know the full theory myself. Their paper is too phenomenological for me. A discussion could also start here: motls.blogspot.com/2016/02/does-moon-cause-more-rain.html?m=1
Feb
4
revised How does the Moon influence atmospheric pressure?
added 276 characters in body
Feb
4
answered How does the Moon influence atmospheric pressure?
Feb
4
answered Ferromagnets - Permanent?
Feb
4
awarded  Enlightened
Feb
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
1
answered Evaporating black hole Penrose diagram
Jan
31
comment What are anticommuting spinor parameters $\zeta^\alpha$?
What is what? Sorry, I don't understand your new question - except as a request to repeat what I wrote which I won't do.
Jan
30
answered What are anticommuting spinor parameters $\zeta^\alpha$?
Jan
29
comment Derivation of Maxwell's equations from field tensor lagrangian
Hi @user17574 - doesn't "which" tensor depend on the partial derivatives? Surely the stress-energy tensor does, and so does the Lagrangian. That's why the derivative of it with respect to the partial derivatives is nonzero. The derivative is calculated in the answer. The product rule indeed works and it's why one cancels the factor of $1/2$. Have you tried to read the answer?
Jan
28
answered Does the Higgs Field positive value correlate with “giving mass”?
Jan
27
answered Could dark matter be like ether?
Jan
26
comment Apparent paradox concerning Heisenberg's uncertainty principle
Dear Rohit, don't forget that the electron also has a magnetic moment - it's a small magnet oriented along the direction of its spin which generally differs from the direction of the magnetic field.
Jan
26
comment Apparent paradox concerning Heisenberg's uncertainty principle
The whole story is full of many other wrong statements. For example, electrons aren't moving along straight lines in magnetic fields even in a classical theory. They move along circles or spirals, right? Also, all the claims that "the uncertainty is zero" are absolutely unjustified. To say that the uncertainty is zero means to be able to measure it, and know that the measurement is precise etc. In reality, it never is quite precise.
Jan
24
awarded  Good Answer