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1d
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Can one pump water without providing an external source of energy?
1d
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Can one pump water without providing an external source of energy?
2d
reviewed Approve suggested edit on It is a numerical
Apr
21
reviewed Approve suggested edit on What is angular speed after 2nd collision? speed of block? time?
Apr
16
comment What is an intuitive explanation using forces for the equatorial bulge?
@Qmechanic, I have also edited to ask for a "forces" approach rather than an "energy" approach which was used in the question you have linked.
Apr
16
comment What is an intuitive explanation using forces for the equatorial bulge?
I particularly want the explanation using a force approach. I have edited my question accordingly.
Apr
16
revised What is an intuitive explanation using forces for the equatorial bulge?
added 28 characters in body
Apr
16
comment Acceleration is zero, for non-zero net force
The answer is simple, the table is on an angle and you are pushing upwards against gravity.
Apr
16
comment What is an intuitive explanation using forces for the equatorial bulge?
@Qmechanic, those answers seem 10x more complicated than what my question is asking for. Do they really provide a "simple intuitive explanation to explain to others"?
Apr
16
comment What is an intuitive explanation using forces for the equatorial bulge?
the centripetal force at the poles is indeed less by your equation, however the component of gravity in this direction is also less at the equator and it exactly balances. This is why I want to see a complete derivation of why it should bulge, because the centripetal argument just doesn't seem to hold up.
Apr
16
asked What is an intuitive explanation using forces for the equatorial bulge?
Apr
3
comment Expectation Values and Derivation of Heisenberg Equation?
@AriBenCanaan, rather than dividing both sides by i, instead you can simply multiply both sides by i. E.g. iA = B, then iiA = iB, then -A = iB. I think this trick is easier than the divide by i suggested by Kyle and Nuclear, but ultimately it is just a matter of individual style, but it is good to know both.
Apr
3
answered Expectation Values and Derivation of Heisenberg Equation?
Mar
19
comment Why $-i\hbar\vec\nabla$ for momentum in quantum mechanics, while $m\vec{v}$ in classical mechanics?
Well the intermediate thought process in developing that momentum operator was the de-broglie relationship, momentum = h/wavelength. From there the connection becomes obvious.
Feb
24
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Little confusion in drawing Feynmam diagram
Feb
11
revised Can frequency be equal to 0?
edited body
Jan
21
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
9
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
19
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
8
comment Please describe how a vacuum flask/thermos works
Yes, it stops the heat transfer through "conduction" predominantly, as the vacuum has no particles in it to vibrate and transfer the energy from inside the insulator to the outside. Heat can still be lost through radiation however, because radiation can travel through a vacuum, as evidenced by the sun rays reaching earth.