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seen Feb 20 at 23:30

Feb
20
awarded  Tumbleweed
Feb
13
asked Limits of Poisson's ratio in isotropic solid
Feb
6
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
28
accepted Understanding formula for wave displacement
Jun
28
comment Understanding formula for wave displacement
Awesome! Thanks a lot for your very clear explanation. I really appreciate it.
Jun
28
asked Understanding formula for wave displacement
Jan
27
accepted Refraction seismology - travel time for wave
Jan
27
comment Refraction seismology - travel time for wave
Ah! Thanks a lot. Yes, you are absolutely right. I mixed up the t-intercept and the travel time. Now it all makes sense.
Jan
24
comment Refraction seismology - travel time for wave
Thanks. I would really, really be grateful if you could provide me with the derivation.
Jan
23
awarded  Editor
Jan
23
revised Refraction seismology - travel time for wave
deleted 1 characters in body
Jan
23
asked Refraction seismology - travel time for wave
Oct
19
comment Jumping on earth versus jumping on the moon
Yes, as I wrote below, it turns out I screwed this one up by assuming $v_0$ to be equal in both jumps. Hopefully this will be the only major blunder on the exam (which I felt I did quite well on otherwise).
Oct
19
comment Jumping on earth versus jumping on the moon
Thank you so much for your answer. I actually got a confirmation from my professor today that this was indeed how we were supposed to interpret the problem. So it turns out I was wrong after all. Too bad, but at least now I will be more careful with problems such as these in the future when it comes to making assumptions.
Oct
18
comment Jumping on earth versus jumping on the moon
Thanks a lot! I am crossing my fingers I interpreted it correctly. The way I stated the problem is a direct copy of the way the problem was asked, and, as mentioned, this is a non-calculus based physics class. During the exam I thought perhaps our professor added the mass-information just to throw us a bit off track. Time will tell if I'm right :)
Oct
18
accepted Jumping on earth versus jumping on the moon
Oct
18
comment Jumping on earth versus jumping on the moon
Thanks a lot! As mentioned above, this is an introductory physics class with no calculus. So I am actually unsure as to whether or not we were suppose to assume $v_0$ is equal or not.
Oct
18
awarded  Commentator
Oct
18
comment Jumping on earth versus jumping on the moon
Thanks a lot. This question was actually given today on a mid-term exam. However, I am taking an introductory algebraic-based physics class, so it may be quite possible that we were actually supposed to assume that $v_0$ is equal on both jumps. Is there any way to find the differences in $v_0$ without resorting to calculus?
Oct
18
asked Jumping on earth versus jumping on the moon