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comment Optical illusion of car wheels, speeding up
I think that this is entirely wrong - our eyes do not have a "framerate" in the same way that video cameras or monitors do. Individual photoreceptors may have a maximum rate at which they can detect flickering, but since they are not synchronized in any meaningful way, this does not lead to a fixed "framerate". Also the brain has limits on how fast it can process individual images, but this is just a floor, not a framerate. You may see aliasing effects indoors when your light source is flickering at a fixed rate, but this has more to do with the light source than any "framerate" in our eyes.
Aug
7
comment How are complex sound waves combined?
"I like to think of a piano as an inverse Fourier transform machine." This is one of the best analogies I have run across in a long time.
Dec
13
comment Is it possible for the planets to align?
BUT PLUTO'S NOT A PLANET! ;-) Poor Pluto. We miss you.
Dec
13
comment Is it possible for the planets to align?
Check this out: physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=417310 , specifically the answers by member "mikelepore".
Dec
13
comment Is it possible for the planets to align?
Some of the planes are "tilted", but in general they share roughly the same plane. This makes sense to me, because planets which orbit different planes would always see some degree of attraction between each other. Although minuscule compared to their attraction towards the Sun, this attraction would be non-uniform, always tending ever-so-slightly to the plane of their neighbors'. Over billions of years, maybe this attracts them all towards the same plane? (p.s. I'm a computer programmer, not an astrophysicist. So I might be WAY off. Like ASTRONOMICALLY off! haha GET it??) :-)
Sep
13
comment Where does the lost energy go in a rubber band powering a rotating shaft?
Thanks for the awesome answer!
Sep
13
comment Where does the lost energy go in a rubber band powering a rotating shaft?
Hmmm, that's very interesting. Thanks for taking the time to answer! How about if we remove the propellers, then, and just have the shafts? I think the rest still stands (shaft A would finish quicker; shaft B would take longer and end up hotter), and the surface friction of the air on the shafts would be negligible, I think. Thanks again!